You & Your Brain: A Collaboration of HealthyWomen, Prevention & Women’s Alzheimer’s Movement at Cleveland Clinic

A message from Maria Shriver Have you ever had a gut feeling about a decision? Or felt sick to your stomach over bad news? Experts say that’s because the gut is nearly as powerful a force as the brain, affecting your physical and mental health.Learn from leading experts about the powerful gut-brain connection and how what you eat might affect anxiety and mood, increase the risk for Alzheimer’s, and more. Discover practical advice on what you can do right now to protect your health

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National Action Plan Survey

HealthyWomen wants women to know that we are our own best advocates — and that self-advocacy is most effective when we are empowered by knowledge about our bodies and our health. Out of our commitment to you and your health the National Action Plan was born. Designed to identify the gaps in midlife women’s healthcare, the first step in the National Action Plan is a benchmark survey. Using the results from the survey, we hope to address health disparities and inequities, the need for edu

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Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) & Aging Survey

HealthyWomen and the National Caucus and Center on Black Aging, Inc. (NCBA) are exploring what people know about HIV and aging, including diagnosis, treatment, testing, stigma and barriers to care. Changes in treatment options are increasing life expectancy for those with HIV. In 2018, over half (51%) of people in the United States with diagnosed HIV were ages 50 and older. We have built this survey to identify any gaps in knowledge to build education resources that help others learn about

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Gut Health and Brain Health. What’s the Connection?

Have you ever had to do a presentation or a big test and felt butterflies in your stomach? Did you wonder why the stress was causing stomach pains? You can thank a little-known nervous system in your gut for that.Most of us have heard of the central nervous system (CNS), which is made of your brain and spinal cord, but there’s another nervous system, too, that you may not have heard of: the enteric nervous system (ENS). The ENS contains a hundred million nerve cells that line the gut, going f

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Are Vitamin and Mineral Infusions Worth the Hype?

Medically reviewed by Dr. Lisa Larkin Have you seen celebrities boasting about the benefits of vitamin and mineral infusions on social media? Also known as hydration therapy or IV therapy, these infusions deliver high quantities of vitamins and minerals directly into the bloodstream using an intravenous (IV) drip. So why are Adele, Rihanna, Madonna and many more getting these treatments — and should you consider trying this expensive service too? We asked Dr. Lisa Larkin, an internal medici

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You Can Test Yourself for an STI at Home — but Should You?

At-home medical testing gives you information about your health, right at your fingertips, without the need to ever set foot into a doctor’s office. One of the latest developments in this trend is at-home testing for sexually transmitted infections (STIs), which are bacterial, viral or parasitic infections that can be passed on through sexual contact. Traditionally, STI testing involves seeing a doctor in person. There, they can often take samples like urine or vaginal fluids and send the

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Good Sex With Emily Jamea: The Top 10 Health Benefits of Sex

Emily Jamea, Ph.D., is a sex therapist, author and podcast host. You can find her here each month to share her latest thoughts about sex. I don’t know about you, but I love that things were once deemed indulgent but are now considered healthy. Dark chocolate? Hand it over. A glass of red wine? Yes, please! Good sex? Yeah, baby! It seems that we’re gradually moving away from the puritanical ideology of abstinence and restraint and giving into the truth that, well … pleasure not just f

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15 Minutes With: Jaclyn Smith Talks to HealthyWoman on the 20th Anniversary of Her Breast Cancer Diagnosis

Jaclyn Smith, one of the original Charlie’s Angels, is an award-winning actress and entrepreneur who played Kelly Garret on the popular TV show for five years, among many other accomplishments. In 1985, Smith introduced a fashion line in K-Mart, becoming one of the first celebrities to develop her own brand. She has since gone on to develop brands in home furnishings, wigs, beauty and fabric. Smith recently spoke to our editor–in-chief about her diagnosis and treatment for breast cancer.The

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When It Comes to Your Microbiome, More Germs Are Better

One of the hottest topics in scientific research today is the microbiome and its effects on human health. Microbes appear to play a role in how we sleep, how likely we are to develop certain diseases and whether we’ll develop allergies — and seemingly everything in between.What is the microbiome?The microbiome is a group of microorganisms (also called microbiota or microbes) that live in a particular environment. These microbes include bacteria, viruses, parasites and fungi, which we someti

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Black Women Have Many Risks to Their Mental Health. For Me, Juneteenth Is a Day of Healing.

The temperature climbed past 80 degrees as my children and I followed the marked route between historic dwellings in a suburban downtown district just minutes from our home. Their breath grew labored, their pace slowed in the early afternoon heat, and they were thankful for the breaks each time we stopped to listen to a new building’s history.We learned how the basement of a classic 19th-century mansion turned bed-and-breakfast had once been an overnight hiding place for hundreds of enslaved

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I Thought I Conquered Insomnia. Then I Didn’t Sleep for Four Days.

As told to Erica Rimlinger The night we buried my father, I didn’t sleep. The second night after his death, I walked until I was exhausted, and I didn’t sleep. The third night, my brain buzzed with an incredible, spiritual connection to my father. I outlined three books and four business ideas, and I didn’t sleep. The fourth night after my father’s death, I didn’t sleep — and I was getting very, very scared. From a young age, I was a problem-solver and a caretaker. I understood my p

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Green Salad Roll-Up

Yields: 1 Servings 1 cup romaine leaves or other lettuce 1/4 cup alfalfa or mung bean sprouts 2 radishes 1/4 cup canned chickpeas 2 tablespoon carrots 1 tablespoon fat-free Italian dressing 1 teaspoon red wine vinegar 1 large flour or vegetable-flavored tortillas Directions: In a medium bowl, combine lettuce, sprouts, radishes, chickpeas and carrots. In a small bowl, combine dressing and vinegar. Pour over salad and toss to coat. Spoon greens onto one side of tortilla. Roll like

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As a Breastfeeding Mom Who Also Worked as a Lactation Consultant, I Thought My Breast Lump Was a Clogged Milk Duct

As told to Erica Rimlinger My three children and I had an easy time breastfeeding, and I nursed my children for as long as possible. Friends teased, “Those babies are old enough to ask for a soda,” but I didn’t care. I’m an insurance agent by trade and a health advocate by passion. I taught exercise classes for pregnant women and provided lactation education for women in the WIC program. I’m a cheerleader for wellness, and I promote the health-enhancing benefits of breastfeeding for m

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Where Metastatic Breast Cancer Can Spread in the Body

Designed by Megan Schofield Metastatic breast cancer is a type of advanced breast cancer that has spread (metastasized) beyond the breasts. This is the most advanced stage of breast cancer. The symptoms and diagnosis of metastatic breast cancer depend on where the cancer has spread in the body. This will also influence the treatment options, which can be tailored to the person. Metastatic breast cancer can spread to any part of the body, but the following locations are the most common. Bones

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Dangerous Counterfeit Drugs Are Putting Millions of US Consumers at Risk, According to a New Study

By C. Michael White, University of ConnecticutThe Research Brief is a short take about interesting academic work. The big ideaThe Food and Drug Administration took 130 enforcement actions against counterfeit medication rings from 2016 through 2021, according to my new study published in the journal Annals of Pharmacotherapy. Such actions might involve arrests, confiscation of products or counterfeit rings being dissolved.These counterfeiting operations involved tens of millions of pills, more

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This Is Your Brain on No Sleep

The day after not sleeping well, you may feel a little foggy, a bit hungrier than normal, slower to react, irritable and perhaps even a bit down in the dumps. Or you may feel perfectly fine — even finer if you're fueling up with caffeine. Whether you notice yourself feeling off or you feel nothing unusual at all, what’s happening in your sleep-deprived brain is the same, and it’s not good. Without the flush of sleep, our brains get clogged up “Our brain is like a grocery store,”

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National Action Plan Survey

HealthyWomen wants women to know that we are our own best advocates — and that self-advocacy is most effective when we are empowered by knowledge about our bodies and our health. Out of our commitment to you and your health the National Action Plan was born. Designed to identify the gaps in midlife women’s healthcare, the first step in the National Action Plan is a benchmark survey. Using the results from the survey, we hope to address health disparities and inequities, the need for e

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What Your Odor Says About Your Health

There’s body odor, and then there’s body odor. Sure, we can all get a little stinky from time to time — and that’s to be expected — but sometimes an unusual body odor can be the result of an underlying condition. We asked Dr. Sharon Allison-Ottey, executive director of the COSHAR Healthy Communities Foundation and a member of HealthyWomen's Women's Health Advisory Council what odors are simply a part of life — and when we should be concerned. The science behind body odor The body o

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El insomnio no es solo una molestia. Puede tener efectos graves en tu salud.

La primera vez que Erika Zar visitó a un doctor por su incapacidad para dormir o por insomnio, tenía 9 años. “Recuerdo principalmente que me preguntó cuántas bebidas gaseosas tomé”, dijo. Desafortunadamente, el doctor no pudo ayudarla. El insomnio de Erika continuó hasta su vida adulta, empeorando sus problemas de salud mental. “Por muchos años antes de que aprendiese a manejarlo, el insomnio sin duda fue un factor que empeoraba la ansiedad y la depresión que he tenido toda mi

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Race, Gender and the Ways These Identities Intersect Matter in Cancer Outcomes

By Timothy Pawlik, The Ohio State University; Elizabeth Palmer, The Ohio State University, and Samilia Obeng-Gyasi, The Ohio State UniversityThe Research Brief is a short take about interesting academic work. The big ideaBelonging to one or more groups with long-standing social and economic disadvantages increases the risk of cancer diagnoses and death, according to our review of 28 cancer studies published between 2012 and 2021. People who were both nonwhite and LGBTQ received fewer cancer p

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This Is Your Brain on No Sleep

The day after not sleeping well, you may feel a little foggy, a bit hungrier than normal, slower to react, irritable and perhaps even a bit down in the dumps. Or you may feel perfectly fine — even finer if you're fueling up with caffeine. Whether you notice yourself feeling off or you feel nothing unusual at all, what’s happening in your sleep-deprived brain is the same, and it’s not good. Without the flush of sleep, our brains get clogged up “Our brain is like a grocery store,” said

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Women Having Surgery Get Better Results if Their Surgeon Is a Woman

Going into surgery is daunting, no matter who you are. There’s a lot to consider, from how you prepare and what your insurance covers to what hospital you choose and your relationship with your healthcare provider. You might be surprised to hear that even the gender of your surgeon may factor into whether you have complications from surgery — or even survive. And this is even more relevant if you’re a woman.A recent observational study published in The Journal of the American Medical Asso

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Growing Older With HIV

In 1986, Stephanie Brooks Wiggins had just moved from Brooklyn to Baltimore with her soon-to-be husband and was excited to start their new life together when she was diagnosed with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). She was barely 40 years old. “I was very naive. I had never heard of HIV,” Brooks Wiggins said. Her biggest worry was her new husband. “How was I going to tell him that I had this disease that was going to kill me?” Now 76, Brooks Wiggins is living a full and active life

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My Quest for Uninterrupted Sleep

It usually happens slowly. Like the corner of a shade being lifted in a blackened room, letting in a sliver of light, thoughts about what I need to get done and my children away at college creep into the edge of my sleeping brain. I can feel them as little shards of light poking at me to wake up. I try to ignore them, so I can be left asleep in the darkness. But I inevitably lose the battle and open my eyes. Insomnia has struck again. I can’t remember the last time I slept through the night.

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15 Minutes With: Dr. Neel Shah Talks to HealthyWomen About Racism in Healthcare

Dr. Neel Shah is chief medical officer of Maven Clinic, the world's largest virtual clinic for women's and family health, assistant professor of obstetrics, gynecology and reproductive biology at Harvard Medical School and the founder of Costs of Care.Shah is featured in “The Color of Care,” an original documentary from Oprah Winfrey’s Harpo productions and the Smithsonian Channel that chronicles how people of color suffer from systemically substandard healthcare in the U.S. and how Covid

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Life After Diagnosis: Navigating the Things You Love with Urothelial Bladder Cancer

Lean on your support systemWhether it is family, friends, religious groups, support groups, professional counselors, or others, it is important to build a support system to help you cope with your diagnosis, after care, and day to day tasks. A cancer diagnosis can trigger feelings such as depression, anxiety, worry. Therefore, patients can benefit from having people to talk to both personal and professional.Embracing your styleWomen who have surgery and have to wear an ostomy bag following a bl

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A Misdiagnosed Ectopic Pregnancy Nearly Sent Me Into Septic Shock

As told to Liz SauchelliThe blinding pain in my lower abdomen hit me when I was in the shower, causing me to double over. I knew I needed to go to the emergency room. I got out of the shower immediately, throwing on whatever clothes I could find, and rushed to my car. One thing that struck me was that there was no blood; later I’d find out that was because it was pooled in my abdomen, causing massive internal bleeding. I still don’t quite know how I managed the five-minute drive to the ER.

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Should You Worry About Data From Your Period-Tracking App Being Used Against You?

By Hannah Norman, Kaiser Health News and Victoria KnightIt’s estimated that millions of people in the U.S. use period-tracking apps to plan ahead, track when they are ovulating, and monitor other health effects. The apps can help signal when a period is late. After Politico published on May 2 a draft opinion from the Supreme Court indicating that Roe v. Wade, the landmark decision that guarantees the constitutional right to an abortion, would be overturned, people turned to social media. They

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Insomnia Isn’t Just an Annoyance. It Can Have Serious Effects on Your Health.

The first time Erika Zar saw a doctor about her inability to sleep, or insomnia, she was 9 years old. “I mostly remember him asking questions about how much soda I drank,” she said. Unfortunately, the doctor wasn’t able to help her. Zar’s insomnia followed her into adulthood, worsening her mental health problems along the way.“For the many years before I learned to manage it, insomnia was no doubt a contributing factor to my lifelong anxiety and depression,” Zar said. “I remember

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My Life Really Began When I Got My Breast Cancer Diagnosis

As told to Shannon Shelton MillerI always dreamed of being a professional singer. Growing up in the church, I began singing from an early age and I have a passion for soulful R&B.For too long, my dream remained just that — a dream. I got married, had children and immersed myself in raising a family. I was so focused on taking care of everyone else that I ignored the pain I felt in 2015 while breastfeeding my third child. When I went to see the doctor, I was told the pain was from swollen milk

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A Quest for Significance Gone Horribly Wrong – How Mass Shooters Pervert a Universal Desire to Make a Difference in the World

By Arie Kruglanski, University of Maryland Agonizing questions are being raised by the recent tragic mass shootings at a school in Texas and a supermarket in Buffalo, New York. As in the recent years’ similar acts of horror at a synagogue in Pittsburgh, a Walmart in El Paso, and a mosque in Christchurch, New Zealand, people want to know how such senseless acts of violence can even happen, why they happen so often, and whether anything can be done to stem their dreadful tide. An ea

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From Shame to Advocacy: My Decades-Long Journey Living — and Thriving — With HIV

As told to Nicole Audrey Spector The year was 1986. I was 39 years old and newly wed to the love of my life, with whom I bought my first house. My three daughters and stepdaughter were both grown, married and doing well. I loved my job in the finance industry. My life was good — no, my life was wonderful. One day, my company hosted a blood drive. Considering that millions of Americans need blood each year, I didn’t think twice about donating. Several days later, I received a letter from

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A Recap: HealthyWomen’s Webinar, “CURES 2.0: Leading Women’s Health Forward”

The United States Congress has the power to give women resources, tools and treatments to improve their own health and the health of their families. According to HealthyWomen’s CEO Beth Battaglino, RN-C, bipartisan legislation moving through Congress — the Cures 2.0 Act — would do just that. To examine key provisions and implications of the legislation, HealthyWomen hosted a webinar, “CURES 2.0: Leading Women’s Health Forward,” on May 11, 2022. Moderated by Arika Pierce, J.D., found

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Good Sex With Emily Jamea: Is an Open Relationship Right for You?

When I first started practicing as a sex and relationship therapist nearly 15 years ago, the idea of open relationships was something my clients brought up once every six months or so. These days, the question about whether to explore consensual non-monogamy comes up nearly once a week.Consensual non-monogamy is an umbrella term that we use to describe a variety of open relationship structures. Regardless of the structure a couple chooses, one thing is clear — the couple mutually agrees to op

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Cómo manejar un diagnóstico de cáncer colorrectal

Marzo es el mes de concientización del cáncer colorrectal a nivel nacional. Jamie VandenAvond notó sangre en su materia fecal a principios de 2021. Se preocupó un poco, pero también tenía que cuidar un bebé recién nacido en medio de la pandemia, así que hizo una nota mental de llamar a su doctor. Luego Jamie empezó a tener deposiciones urgentes que le obligaban a correr al baño cada vez más frecuentemente y su médico recomendó una colonoscopía. Aunque sangre y un cambio de la fre

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Rick Bright Talks to HealthyWomen About Antimicrobial Resistance (AMR)

Rick Bright, Ph.D., is an immunologist who has been working to address emerging infectious diseases for decades. Among his many accomplishments, Bright led and coordinated the U.S. and global medical countermeasure development for the 2014 MERS outbreak (another coronavirus). In 2020, Bright made headlines when he resigned from government service in protest over the Trump administration’s handling of the Covid-19 pandemic, specifically over the level of political interference over science and

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Cáncer colorrectal 101

El Dr. Robert Nagourney hizo la revisión médica de este documento Marzo es el mes de concientización del cáncer colorrectal a nivel nacional. El cáncer colorrectal se origina en el colon o en el recto, y también se conoce como cáncer rectal o de colon, dependiendo de en qué lugar se encontraron por primera vez las células cancerosas. El colon es la parte del intestino grueso a través del cual se mueve la comida y el recto es la parte inferior del colon donde se almacenan los desperdic

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You Have Advanced Breast Cancer. What’s Next?

I still remember that day so clearly. I was sitting across from my breast cancer surgeon when she held up an image. “It looks like a bomb went off in your chest,” she said. I thought this sounded a bit dramatic, but apparently the lump I discovered a few weeks earlier was just the tip of the cancer-berg in my right breast. Based on the imaging and a prior biopsy, we were looking at advanced breast cancer, which is when the disease has spread to the lymph nodes (stage 3) or other areas of t

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What’s Behind the US Baby Formula Shortage – and How to Make Sure It Doesn’t Happen Again

By Steven A. Abrams, University of Texas at Austin A baby formula shortage has added to the woes of American parents already confronted with the pressures of raising an infant during a pandemic in a country ranked low for family-friendly policies. Media reports have highlighted the plight of mothers, fathers and caregivers across the U.S. who have scrambled to find scarce supplies, or driven long distances to buy formula. But what is behind the shortage? And how can it be prevented from

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Even When IVF Is Covered by Insurance, High Bills and Hassles Abound

By Phil Galewitz, Kaiser Health NewsAfter years of trying to have a baby without success, Brenna Kaminski and her husband, Joshua Pritt, decided to try in vitro fertilization. Only 15 states require insurance to cover fertility treatments, and Florida, where Kaminski and Pritt live, isn’t one of them. Still, the couple’s insurance, from Pritt’s job at an energy company, did — putting them among the fortunate minority of Americans whose insurance plan covers the pricey fertility procedur

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Take Charge of Your Advanced Breast Cancer Diagnosis

Breast cancer is the most common form of cancer in women, other than skin cancer — and that means you probably know someone who’s been affected by breast cancer in some way.Though any cancer diagnosis is scary, women living with advanced or metastatic breast cancer are more likely to experience significant emotional stress than those with a less advanced stage of breast cancer. And women of color face unique challenges from the disease, with Black women being 40% more likely to die from bre

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Qué influencia tiene el eccema en la salud sexual

Mariah Woodson, una empresaria de 30 años de Los Ángeles, tuvo que luchar con el eccema (también conocido como dermatitis atópica) desde los 20 años. “¡No bromeo, mis manos y cuello parecían los de un cocodrilo!”, recordó ella. “Siempre dije (bromeando) que si algún hombre me propusiera matrimonio, la apariencia de mis manos haría que huyera. Y corra lejos muy rápidamente”.La intimidad durante un brote es difícil, dijo. “Muchas personas no entienden que el eccema no es con

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Eccema y los niños: Qué pueden hacer los padres para mantener saludables a sus hijos

Cuando la hija de Laura Fellows tenía apenas 2 meses, esta madre primeriza notó unas manchas ásperas, rojas y resecas en la piel de sus mejillas y atrás de sus rodillas. La piel parecía inflamada y la comezón de su hija no paraba. Afortunadamente, ya tenía agendada una consulta médica mensual para su recién nacida. En dicha consulta, su hija recibió un diagnóstico de dermatitis atópica, una condición que también se conoce como eccema.“Sospechaba que era eccema”, dijo Laura.

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The Truth About Being a Cancer Warrior

When I found out I had breast cancer, I decided to be open about my diagnosis. I wanted my interactions with people, even those on the outer rungs of my social circle, to be authentic — a quality I didn’t think I’d convey with an undisclosed elephant-sized cancer diagnosis in the room. Messages of support poured in. People wanted me to know I would beat it because I was strong, a fighter, a warrior even. The day I got my mediport — the quarter-sized device that would sit just above my h

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Why Do Women of Color Have Worse Breast Cancer Outcomes?

In 2013, Katrece Nolen, a 47-year-old Black woman in Northern Virginia, noticed one of her breasts felt swollen. She called her doctor and was sent for a mammogram. The results did not confirm the presence of cancer, so Nolen was prescribed an antibiotic regimen for what was thought to be mastitis. Several weeks later, her breast was even more swollen. Nolen contacted the office of a breast surgeon and was told they couldn’t see her for two months. “An offer was not made to check with t

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Antimicrobial Resistance (AMR): What You Need to Know to Keep Yourself and Your Family Safe

Antibiotics have no effect against a virus, yet most of us have been prescribed antibiotics for viral conditions like cold symptoms or bronchial infections at some point. While that practice might have seemed harmless, decades of overuse and misuse of antimicrobials have contributed to antimicrobial resistance (AMR), which is when germs change over time and no longer respond to common medications. Each year, more than 2.8 million antibiotic-resistant infections occur in the United States al

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Achoo! 5 Essential Reads for Pollen Season

By Jennifer Weeks, The ConversationAs spring expands across North America, trees, shrubs and flowers are releasing pollen. This fine, powdery substance is produced by the male structures of cone-bearing and flowering plants. When it’s carried to the plants’ female structures by wind, water or pollinators, fertilization happens. As pollen travels, it also triggers allergies in some 25 million Americans. Pollen exposure can cause sneezing, coughing, itchy eyes, runny nose and postnasal drip

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I Contracted a Superbug That’s a Top Public Health Threat — And It’s More Common Than You Think

Eight years ago, I was a healthy 54-year-old woman. I often joked that I was too healthy — I rarely had a cold and never had the flu. Antimicrobial resistance (AMR), the term for germs that no longer respond to medication so medications become ineffective, wasn’t really on my radar even though I was a licensed practical nurse. I never thought I could contract an antibiotic-resistant bug myself, but a trip to the ER changed everything. Shortly after I turned 55, I began experiencing atrial f

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You & Your Brain: A Collaboration of HealthyWomen, Prevention & Women’s Alzheimer’s Movement at Cleveland Clinic

A message from Maria Shriver Have you ever had a gut feeling about a decision? Or felt sick to your stomach over bad news? Experts say that’s because the gut is nearly as powerful a force as the brain, affecting your physical and mental health. Join moderator Joan Lunden and leading experts in brain health on June 9, 2022 at noon ET to learn about the powerful gut-brain connection and how what you eat might affect anxiety and mood, increase the risk for Alzheimer’s, and more. Bes

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Let’s Talk About Osteoporosis

Did you know that one in two women will break a bone in their lifetime as a result of osteoporosis? That makes the condition, which causes bones to become brittle and fragile, a greater risk than breast cancer, heart attack and stroke — combined. At HealthyWomen, we want to help you better understand osteoporosis, why it's more common in women than men, and the questions you should ask your healthcare provider about prevention, treatment, tests and more. While women who are experiencing me

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Answers About Ashwagandha

Medically reviewed by Dr. Melanie FiorellaHave you seen ashwagandha’s benefits touted on social media? It’s an herbal remedy used for treating symptoms of stress, anxiety and insomnia — but is it worthy of the attention?We reached out to Dr. Melanie Fiorella, a primary care physician and director of the Center for Integrative Education at University of California San Diego, to get the facts.What is ashwagandha?Ashwagandha, also called winter cherry or ashvagandha, is an herb used in tradi

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I Made a Promise to My Son

As told to Jaimie Seaton When our son Aidan was in pre-K, the teachers wanted to put him in a gifted school. But I felt like he was still a baby, and I wanted him to have a normal childhood and not be overwhelmed with schoolwork, so my husband and I opted to keep him in the same school, where he played soccer and chess. Even at that young age, he was a good chess player. We had no reason to believe that anything was wrong with him or that anything was going on in his body until the latter part

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Clinically Speaking: Questions and Answers About Avoiding Infection When Having Outpatient Surgery

Having to get any type of surgery, no matter how simple the procedure may seem, can be scary. The Covid-19 pandemic, with its new health risks and protocols to follow, makes it even more stressful for patients. While the pandemic initially decreased the number of outpatient surgeries being performed, they are back to pre-pandemic levels, which had been on the rise even before then: In 1995, 13.4 million surgeries took place at hospital-owned centers and by 2018, there were 19.2 million. I

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Fast Facts: What You Need to Know About Smoking and Bladder Cancer

Medically reviewed by Dr. Andrea Apolo Cigarette smoking is the greatest risk factor for bladder cancer in both men and women. 50% of all cases of bladder cancer are associated with smoking. Past studies have shown that smoking was responsible for 28% of bladder cancer cases in women, and since 2011, the risk for women has increased to 50%. Current smokers are four times as likely to get bladder cancer when compared to those who have never smoked. Former smokers are twice as likely to

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My Symptoms Were Dismissed as Hemorrhoids, but I Had Colon Cancer

As told to Liz Sauchelli The day I got my colon cancer diagnosis, my husband and I bought a bottle of champagne. We were driving home from the hospital crying and I just said, “Babe, we need to stop and get a bottle of champagne because we’re going to toast to kicking cancer’s butt and being on the other side of this thing.” In the picture I have from our toast that day, our eyes are swollen from tears. My cancer journey began nearly seven months earlier in January, when I was 47.

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5 Things You Should Know About Antimicrobial Resistance (AMR) and Covid-19

▼ FACT #1: Antibiotics should not be used to treat Covid-19 There are no antibiotics that can treat Covid-19 because Covid-19 is caused by a virus, not bacteria. Antibiotics are only effective against bacterial infections and do not work against viruses. ▼ FACT #2: The misuse of antibiotics, such as to treat Covid-19, can lead to an increase in antimicrobial resistance (AMR) Antimicrobial resistance (AMR) occurs when microbes (bacteria, viruses, fungi and parasites) change

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The Unicorn in the Room: My Infertility Journey Led to an Unexpected Discovery

As told to Nicole Audrey SpectorApril 24-30 is National Infertility Awareness Week.Why don’t we just give it a try and see what happens?That was the attitude with which my husband, Luis, and I began our journey to make a baby. I was 32 and didn’t feel in a rush. I was also confident that I’d get pregnant since I’d been pregnant before (unfortunately I suffered a miscarriage). But a year passed with no luck. We upped the ante. I began tracking my cycles using ovulation kits. But still no

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Staring at an Image of Yourself on Zoom Has Serious Consequences for Mental Health – Especially for Women

By Roxanne Felig, University of South Florida and Jamie Goldenberg, University of South FloridaIn the past few years, people across the world have spent more time on video chat programs like Zoom and FaceTime than ever before. These applications mimic in-person encounters by allowing users to see the people they are communicating with. But unlike in-person communications, these programs often also show users a video of themselves. Instead of catching the occasional glimpse of themselves in a

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Should You Wear a Mask on a Plane, Bus or Train When There’s No Mandate? 4 Essential Reads to Help You Decide

By Daniel Merino, The ConversationOn April 18, 2022, a judge in Florida struck down the federal mandate requiring passengers on mass transit to wear masks. While the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention still recommends that passengers mask up while on planes, trains or buses, it is no longer a requirement. When asked whether people should wear masks on planes, President Joe Biden replied: “That’s up to them.”The Conversation has been covering the science of masks since the b

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Conversación sobre la salud: Preguntas y respuestas sobre el insomnio

La Dra. Smita Patel hizo la revisión médica de este documentoCualquier persona puede tener dificultades para dormir de vez en cuando, pero si eso sucede mucho, podrías tener un trastorno del sueño denominado insomnio y millones de estadounidenses padecen de esta condición.Hablamos con la Dra. Smita Patel, una neuróloga integrativa, especialista de medicina del sueño y miembro del consejo de asesoría de la salud de la mujer de HealthyWomen, para obtener más información sobre la condici

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The Dietary Supplement You’re Taking Could Be Tainted With Prescription Medications and Dangerous Hidden Ingredients, According to a New Study

By C. Michael White, University of ConnecticutThe Research Brief is a short take about interesting academic work.The big ideaMany over-the-counter dietary supplement products – particularly those used for sexual enhancement and weight loss – are tainted with undisclosed pharmaceutical ingredients. That is the key finding of my recently published review in the Journal of Clinical Pharmacology.My assessment of the Food and Drug Administration’s Health Fraud Product Database turned up 1,06

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Obesity Among Black Women: Fighting the Disease Through Community

April is National Minority Health Month.For Michele Tedder, fighting obesity has been a lifelong journey.Despite years of trying numerous diets and exercise fads, Tedder’s weight continued to rise, surpassing 300 pounds on her 5-foot-1 frame. After developing high blood pressure, joint pain and Type 2 diabetes, she decided to pursue weight loss surgery. A sleeve gastrectomy in late 2017 provided the catalyst she needed to make lasting lifestyle changes, helping her drop 90 pounds. Five years

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How Eczema Affects Sexual Health

Mariah Woodson, a 30-year-old business owner in Los Angeles, started battling eczema (also known as atopic dermatitis) at the age of 20. “I kid you not — my hands and neck looked like they belonged on a crocodile!” she recalled. “I always (jokingly) said that if a man were to ever propose to me with my hands looking like this, he would run away. And run away fast.”Intimacy during a flare-up, she said, is challenging. “Many people do not understand that eczema is not contagious, and

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Living With Atopic Dermatitis (AD)

Expert information and advice to help you — or a loved one — manage the physical and emotional effects of ADAtopic dermatitis (AD), the most common form of eczema, affects nearly 16.5 million Americans, more of whom are women than men — and it’s common for women in their reproductive years (ages 15-49) to experience more severe symptoms.Because this condition affects so many women, HealthyWomen launched a program in June 2021 to educate and empower those living with or caring for a love

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Infertility Isn’t Just a Physical Journey — It’s an Emotional One, Too

April 24-30 is National Infertility Awareness Week. Michelle Anderson and her husband Jeff* were ready to start their family when Michelle turned 33. She stopped taking birth control pills and wasn’t surprised when she didn’t get pregnant right away. But, then six months passed, and then 12. After two years and 24 negative pregnancy tests, Michelle consulted her OB-GYN, who suggested fertility treatments. Michelle resisted. “I’m a spiritual person,” she said. “I always thought

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A Thanksgiving Nightmare Ends in Gratitude

As told to Erica RimlingerThat Thanksgiving, a stomach virus was going around.My son Jackson, a freshman at Bucknell University, returned to our home in Colorado a few days before the Thanksgiving holiday in 2017, perfectly healthy. But two nights before Thanksgiving, he started throwing up and spiked a fever. Wednesday night, he seemed to be improving, and we were encouraged that he had kept down some food that evening: some soup and applesauce.Thanksgiving morning, he slept late. I knocked on

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Beer and Spirits Have More Detrimental Effects on the Waistline and on Cardiovascular Disease Risk Than Red or White Wine

By Brittany Larsen, Iowa State UniversityThe Research Brief is a short take about interesting academic work. The big ideaDrinking beer and spirits is linked to elevated levels of visceral fat – the harmful type of fat that is associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease, metabolic syndrome, and other health complications – whereas drinking wine shows no such association with levels of this harmful fat and may even be protective against it, depending on the type of wine cons

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Why Getting an Endometriosis Diagnosis Is Painfully Slow

At age 10, I felt a warm rush of fluid fill my underpants while attending a friend’s birthday party. I ran to the bathroom to find my underpants and jeans soaked. I was unsure of how to leave without exposing myself as the first of us to get her period while most of my friends hadn’t even bought their first training bra. At home, my stepmother sighed and handed me a large cotton pad. “I wasn’t ready for this,” she told me. Neither was I. From their onset, I could count on my monthly

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New Report Finds U.S. Women Have the Highest Rate of Maternal Deaths Among High-Income Countries

From The Commonwealth Fund The maternal mortality crisis in the United States has been well documented: U.S. women have the highest rate of maternal deaths among high-income countries, while Black women are nearly three times more likely to die from pregnancy-related complications than white women are. But maternal deaths and complications may be a bellwether for the U.S.’s wider failures with respect to women’s health and health care. Highlights of the report include: Among women

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Eczema and Children: What Parents Can Do to Keep Their Kids Healthy

When Laura Fellows' daughter was just 2 months old, the first-time mom noticed some rough, red, dry patches of skin on her cheeks and behind her knees. The skin looked inflamed and her baby couldn’t stop itching. Luckily, she had a newborn monthly appointment already scheduled. At that visit, her daughter was diagnosed with atopic dermatitis, also called eczema. "I had a feeling it was eczema," Fellows said. "And the doctors confirmed it." Eczema is a condition that makes a person's skin in

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It Took 3 Decades for Me to Receive an Endometriosis Diagnosis

As told to Marnie GoodfriendGrowing up in a strict, religious household, there was never a conversation around menstruation. I was 10 years old when I first got my period and was left in the dark wondering what was happening to my body. At age 13, girls and boys were split up for a half-day session at the vacation bible school I attended to learn about the way our bodies’ function and how to revere God within them. A hotline number where you could ask questions and receive pre-recorded answer

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February Policy Roundup

1. HealthyWomen supports a bill to advance research into uterine fibroidsThis month, in honor of Black History Month, HealthyWomen senior policy advisor Martha Nolan published an Op-Ed in The Hill urging Congress to pass a bill that would increase funding for research and education on uterine fibroids. Uterine fibroids are noncancerous tumors that grow in the uterus and can cause severe pelvic pain, severe menstrual bleeding, and pregnancy complications, among other symptoms. Black women are mo

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Health Insurance Coverage for Kids Through Medicaid and CHIP Helps Their Moms Too

By Sebastian Tello-Trillo, University of VirginiaThe Research Brief is a short take about interesting academic work.The big ideaWhen children get health insurance through Medicaid or the Children’s Health Insurance Program, known as CHIP, their families benefit too. That’s what I found through recent research conducted with two fellow health economists, Daniel S. Grossman and Barton Willage. And it was particularly true for their mothers, who become 5% more likely to be in a stable marria

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Colorectal Cancer: What Every Woman Needs to Know

Colon cancer, also called colorectal cancer, is cancer of the large intestine or the rectum, and it’s one of the most common cancers in the United States. As many as 1 in 25 women (and 1 in 23 men) develop colon cancer during their lifetime. Wondering what your risk is and what can you do about it? Trying to figure out whether you need a colonoscopy? In our new program, we delve into these questions so you can better understand the disease and learn how regular screenings can help prevent mos

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Why I’m Speaking Up About Toxic Beauty Standards

I recently started re-reading some of my old journals. I like to do this from time to time because I usually find myself seeing my past in a new light that teaches me something, especially as I get older. Each night, I’d read several entries; some were a mere recounting of the day’s events while others expressed that all-too-common yearning of teenage crushes. It seemed pretty harmless and just as I remembered things happening at the time. But then I noticed something I’d never re

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Eczema Cost Me My Self-Esteem. Now, I’m on the Path to Getting It Back.

As told to Nicole Audrey Spector I was the woman who everybody asked, “What’s your skincare routine? You always look amazing!” I hesitate to use the word “perfect,” as it’s so loaded, but that’s the word that comes to mind when I think of how my skin looked in my 20s and early 30s. I live in Southern California, where the weather is typically sunny and warm. I practically lived in crop tops and shorts. I never thought twice about what I wore as long as I was comfortable.

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Iron Deficiency Anemia: Are You at Risk?

Did you know that about 17% of premenopausal women in the United States are affected by iron deficiency anemia (IDA)? That means your body lacks the iron needed to produce healthy red blood cells that carry oxygen to organs and tissues, often resulting in extreme fatigue, weakness, dizziness or lightheadedness and more. Women and girls are at higher risk of IDA because they lose blood every month during their periods. and many cases are caused by heavy periods. But lots of other conditions

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Fishing, Strip Clubs and Golf: How Male-Focused Networking in Medicine Blocks Female Colleagues From Top Jobs

By Jennifer R. Grandis, University of California, San FranciscoWomen have been entering academic medicine at nearly the same rate as men for decades, but very few women reach the top levels of leadership. For example, as of April 2022, of the 71 U.S. cancer centers designated by the National Cancer Institute, only seven are directed by women. In 2018, women accounted for 16% of medical school deans, 18% of department chairs and 25% of full professors. To this day, women are still less likely

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What Is Vaginal Rejuvenation?

Jada Pinkett Smith. Kim Kardashian. Brandi Glanville. The list of celebrities who have spoken publicly — and enthusiastically — about their experiences with vaginal rejuvenation is long, and many women are following their lead. Driven by a massive increase in demand, the global vaginal rejuvenation market is expected to double in value in the next few years, reaching $12 billion by 2026.While vaginal rejuvenation may be associated with social media influencers and their so-called “designe

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Iron Deficiency Anemia: Are You At Risk?

Did you know that about 17% of premenopausal women in the United States are affected by iron deficiency anemia (IDA)? That means your body lacks the iron needed to produce healthy red blood cells that carry oxygen to organs and tissues, often resulting in extreme fatigue, weakness, dizziness or lightheadedness and more. Women and girls are at higher risk of IDA because they lose blood every month during their periods. and many cases are caused by heavy periods. But lots of other conditions

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Good Sex With Emily Jamea: How to Tell Your Partner About an STI

April is STD Awareness Month.* At any given time, one in five Americans has a sexually transmitted infection (STI). That means there’s a good chance that at least one person in line with you for morning coffee has been there. Even though STIs are very common, having one still carries a lot of shame and stigma. Unfortunately that stigma is partially what contributes to the spread. People are scared to disclose they have an STI because they’re afraid of being judged.That was the case for my c

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What Is Alopecia? It’s No Laughing Matter for Millions of Black American Women

By Danita Peoples, Wayne State UniversityThe Oscar slap that overshadowed the Academy Awards ceremony was sparked by a joke about Jada Pinkett Smith’s lack of hair – with husband Will Smith objecting violently to comedian Chris Rock mocking the actress’s shaved head.Away from the recriminations over what could be perceived as a mean-spirited jibe and a disproportionate response, many people will sympathize with Pinkett Smith. As millions of women in the U.S. will attest, hair loss is no

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Transgender People of Color Face Unique Challenges as Gender Discrimination and Racism Intersect

By Gabriel Lockett, University of Florida; Jules Sostre, University of Florida, and Roberto L. Abreu, University of FloridaThroughout history, transgender people of color have had a place of honor in many indigenous cultures around the world. This changed in many places, however, as European colonizers began forcing indigenous people to follow white social norms. These include anti-Blackness, Christianity and a gender binary that reduced gender to just man and woman. Colonizers presumed that

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I Was Bleeding to Death on the Bathroom Floor — While the Medics Insisted I Couldn’t Afford the Ambulance Ride

As told to Erica RimlingerOne evening during my senior year of college in Texas, I was hanging out at my boyfriend's apartment when a vicious, blinding pain seized my abdomen. It was like I’d been shot, but the pain wasn’t localized: it was everywhere in my torso. I started bleeding like I had my period, even though I didn’t. I thought I was dying. I curled up in a fetal position on the floor, crawling into the bathroom just in time to start throwing up from the pain. I felt like I couldn

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Colorectal Cancer 101

Medically reviewed by Dr. Robert NagourneyColorectal cancer begins in the colon or the rectum, and is also called colon or rectal cancer, depending on where cancer cells are first found. The colon is the part of the large intestine that food moves through, and the rectum is the lower part of the colon where waste is stored before it leaves the body, through the anus. An estimated 106,000 new cases of colon cancer and 44,850 new cases of rectal cancer will be diagnosed in 2022. Risk factors incl

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What Is Aphasia? An Expert Explains the Condition Forcing Bruce Willis to Retire From Acting

Swathi Kiran, Boston UniversityActor Bruce Willis, 67, is “stepping away” from his career in film and TV after being diagnosed with aphasia, his family announced on March 30, 2022.In a message posted on Instagram, his daughter, Rumer Willis, said that the condition was “impacting his cognitive abilities.”Swathi Kiran, director of the Aphasia Research Laboratory at Boston University, explains what aphasia is and how it impairs the communication of those with the condition.What is aphas

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Can Melatonin Gummies Solve Family Bedtime Struggles? Experts Advise Caution

By Jenny Gold, Kaiser Health NewsFor three exhausting years, Lauren Lockwood tried to get her son Rex to sleep through the night. As an infant, he couldn’t sleep without a blanket over his carrier to drown out the world around him. At age 2, it sometimes took hours for him — and her — to fall asleep, only for him to be jolted awake from night terrors that left him shrieking in panic. Over the years, Lockwood, a nurse midwife who runs a group for new moms from her home in Oakland, Californ

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What’s Hot About Menopause? Sex!

It’s time to make Naked Fridays a reality. A lot of people think menopause means less sex, and less enjoyable sex, but the opposite can be true. Hitting menopause can be like hitting the jackpot for sex and intimacy. Here are nine reasons why the end of your periods can be the beginning of a fulfilling sex life.Pregnancy worries are overOnce a woman is in menopause, defined as not having had a period for a full year, she can’t get pregnant, which removes all worries about contraception, con

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Better Sleep, Better Health: A Guide to Understanding Insomnia

We all have a bad night’s sleep on occasion, but if it happens frequently, you may have a sleep disorder. And you’re not alone. Sleep disorders, which are any condition that causes a change in the way you sleep, affect approximately 70 million Americans. Like eating healthily and exercising, getting enough restful sleep is critical to good health. Insomnia can take a toll on physical and mental well-being, worsening existing health problems and increasing your risk of chronic illness down

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What’s Sexual Orientation Got to Do With It? LGTBQ People Face Discrimination in Healthcare

March 21 to March 25 is National LGBTQ Health Awareness Week. At age 28, Laura Silverstein tripped while running, dislocating her pinky finger trying to break her fall. Now 52, Silverstein said her experience at the emergency room that day still gives her “the heebie jeebies.”The doctor probed Silverstein about her birth control method, and when she told him she was in a same-sex relationship, he asked invasive questions about her sexual orientation. When Silverstein, who identifies as bise

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¿Quieres papas fritas o sentimientos con eso?

Mientras su hija, que en esos momentos todavía era una infante, luchaba contra un trastorno neurológico en el hospital, Gabrielle Blawas peleaba su propia batalla en su cabeza, sentada en un carro en un parqueadero de un restaurante de comida rápida. El temor por la salud de su hija hizo que Gabrielle fuera directamente a un restaurante de comida rápida después de cada visita al hospital, donde pedía dos combos completos y las ingería sola en su carro. La comida brindaba consuelo físico

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Even After Lockdowns Eased, Pandemic Depression Persisted Across Social Classes – New Study

By Catherine Ettman, Boston University and Sandro Galea, Boston UniversityThe Research Brief is a short take about interesting academic work. The big ideaOne year into the COVID-19 pandemic, we found that more than 1 in 5 U.S. adults reported probable depression in both spring 2020 and spring 2021. We also found that financial assets helped reduce the persistence of symptoms – but only to a point. Our recently published research highlights COVID-19’s continuing mental health effects on th

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What’s the 411 on the New 988 Hotline? 5 Questions Answered About a National Mental Health Service

By Derek Lee, The Ohio State UniversityBeginning July 16, 2022, people struggling with mental health crises can call 988, a new number focused on providing lifesaving suicide prevention and crisis services. But 988 is not just a shorter, easier-to-remember replacement for the current suicide hotline. Congress and the Federal Communications Commission also established the 988 Lifeline to address longstanding concerns in mental health care.The Conversation asked Derek Lee, a PhD student at Ohio

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HIV Preventive Care Is Supposed to Be Free in the US. So, Why Are Some Patients Still Paying?

By Sarah Varney, Kaiser Health NewsAnthony Cantu, 31, counsels patients at a San Antonio health clinic about a daily pill shown to prevent HIV infection. Last summer, he started taking the medication himself, an approach called preexposure prophylaxis, better known as PrEP. The regimen requires laboratory tests every three months to ensure the powerful drug does not harm his kidneys and that he remains HIV-free. But after his insurance company, Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Texas, billed him hu

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Fast Facts: What You Need to Know About Colorectal Cancer Screening

Medically reviewed by Dr. Robert Nagourney Colorectal cancer — often called colon cancer — occurs when cells in the colon or rectum grow rapidly. The colon is also known as the large intestine or bowel. In the United States, colon cancer is one of the most common cancers. About 1 in 25 women (and 1 in 23 men) develop colon cancer during their lifetimes. Abnormal growths — called polyps — develop in the colon or rectum. Some of these polyps may develop into cancer over time. Polyps

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It’s Illegal — but My Insurance Company Refused to Cover My Birth Control

As told to Shannon Shelton MillerMore than two years ago, I made an appointment with my physician to discuss the best contraceptive options for my healthcare needs. Together, we decided on a method and my physician submitted the prescription to my insurer.I was stunned when my insurer refused to cover my contraceptive of choice, with no explanation provided.I soon learned that I wasn’t alone — women across the United States were sharing similar stories of insurers denying coverage for birth

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From Healthy Births to Sustainable Management, 5 Essential Reads on the Fascinating and Complex Vagina

By Leah Samuel, The ConversationAs the most common route for arriving into the world, the human vagina has, of course, existed for as long as there have been people. Despite the name, however, it’s not so much a “sheath” – the Latin meaning of “vagina” – as it is a muscular tube of varying shapes and lengths, contained unseen within the pelvis. The vagina is actually a hardworking organ in its own right, with its own ecosystem. So The Conversation presents a selection of stories

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Where Are You Getting Your Covid-19 Vaccine Information?

Mashaya Engel spent 2021 researching and preparing for the arrival of her first child. Every day, Engel found herself scouring the internet, reading baby-related articles and using various pregnancy apps, including an app called What to Expect, a pregnancy and baby tracker.Most of what she found on the app was informative and credible — until she came across the community forum. It was there that she saw moms and moms-to-be sharing misinformation and disinformation about vaccines, particularl

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Clinically Speaking: Questions and Answers About Insomnia

Medically reviewed by Dr. Smita PatelAnyone can have trouble sleeping now and then, but if it happens a lot, you may have a sleep disorder called insomnia — and millions of Americans fall into this category.We spoke with Dr. Smita Patel, an integrative neurologist and sleep medicine physician and member of HealthyWomen’s Women’s Health Advisory Council, to find out more about the condition that keeps so many of us awake at night.What is the difference between just a few nights of bad slee

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I Was Searching for a Miracle Cure for My Breast Cancer. I Found Hope Instead.

Medical mayhem struck my life when I was 38. I found a rapidly growing, brittle breast lump during a breast self-exam in the shower. Then, a visit to the breast surgeon confirmed the lump was triple-negative breast cancer, which led to a mastectomy, eight months of chemotherapy and reconstruction. Even after that, the mayhem still wasn’t over. After a brief break, a new lump grew rapidly in my chest wall where my breast had been removed. Once again, I found myself shivering in a thin paper go

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Long Covid Leaves Newly Disabled People Facing Old Barriers — a Sociologist Explains

By Laura Mauldin, University of ConnecticutUp to one-third of COVID-19 survivors will acquire the condition known as long or long-haul COVID-19. The American Academy of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation estimates that long COVID will add as many as 22 million individuals to the U.S. population of disabled people. I am a sociologist and researcher focusing on disability. I am aware of the challenges awaiting newly disabled people living with what scientists call post-acute sequelae of SARS-

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8 Foods to Eat for Healthy Bones

Approximately 8 million American women have osteoporosis, a disease that weakens and thins bones, leaving them fragile and prone to breaking. What you eat plays a key role in bone health, since our bodies rely on nutrients such as calcium and vitamin D to build and maintain strong bones. Not getting enough of these bone-building nutrients can greatly increase your risk of low bone mass. The government recommended daily allowance of calcium is 1,000 mg if you’re between the ages of and 1,200

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Pollen Season Is Getting Longer and More Intense With Climate Change – Here’s What Allergy Sufferers Can Expect in the Future

By Yingxiao Zhang, University of Michigan and Allison L. Steiner, University of MichiganBrace yourselves, allergy sufferers – new research shows pollen season is going to get a lot longer and more intense with climate change.Our latest study finds that the U.S. will face up to a 200% increase in total pollen this century if the world continues producing carbon dioxide emissions from vehicles, power plants and other sources at a high rate. Pollen season in general will start up to 40 days ea

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A Conversation With Janet McUlsky About Patient Advocacy

Janet McUlsky has been working in patient advocacy for more than four decades. She’s a nationally recognized expert and innovator in the field of stakeholder alliance development and programming and is the former senior director of National Alliance Development at Pfizer. McUlsky is this year’s recipient of the Pinnacle Award: Honoring a Career of Outstanding Accomplishments in Advocacy and Alliance, which will be presented at HealthyWomen’s Annual Event on Thursday March 3, 2022. She rec

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The Sex of Your Cells Matters When It Comes to Heart Disease

By Brian Aguado, University of California San DiegoMost mammals, including humans, have two sex chromosomes, X and Y. One sex chromosome is usually inherited from each parent, and they pair up as either XX or XY in every cell of the body. People with XX chromosomes typically identify as female, and people with XY chromosomes typically identify as male. The genes on these chromosomes play a key role in development and function – including how heart disease develops.Before I became a biomedic

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I’m an Optometrist, but That Didn’t Make It Any Easier to Tell My Grandmother She Has Macular Degeneration

As told to Jackie FroeberFebruary is Age-Related Macular Degeneration Awareness Month.Imagine looking across the table at your loved one, but you can’t see their face. Instead, a large black blind spot takes over the center of your vision. No matter how hard you blink or rub your eyes, the blind spot stays. This is what it’s like to have macular degeneration (MD) — an eye disorder where damage to the retina can cause permanent blindness. I learned all about the condition in optometry scho

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Good Sex With Emily Jamea: How to Cope With Your Partner’s Sexual Dysfunction

Max and Jen sat across from me on the sofa. “What brings you in today?” I asked.Max fidgeted nervously on the sofa.“I’ll go first,” said Jen. “Max has erectile dysfunction. It’s gotten really frustrating for both of us. He never wants to do it anymore because he’s so worried he won’t get an erection.”Max was looking at the floor.“And I,” Jen started to cry, “just don’t feel like he even wants me anymore. I don’t feel loved or desired. It’s just devastating.”“

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And Just Like That … I Had a Flash Period

“And Just Like That,” the much anticipated follow-up to “Sex and the City,” depicts the beloved characters dealing with life in their early 50s. In episode nine, Charlotte breezily reported she hadn’t had a period in four months and was through menopause without any hot flashes. Later, she unexpectedly bled while wearing a white jumpsuit (we’ve all been there for that moment). Miranda, tying a sweater around Charlotte’s waist, informed her it was a “flash period.” What is a fl

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Too Many Women Die From Ovarian Cancer. Valerie Palmieri Is on a Mission to Change That.

February is National Cancer Prevention Month. Each year, nearly 20,000 women in the United States are newly diagnosed with ovarian cancer and nearly 13,000 die — more than from any other reproductive system cancer. HealthyWomen had a conversation with Valerie Palmieri, president and chief executive officer of Aspira Women’s Health, to discuss how women can manage ovarian cancer risks. According to Palmieri, most ovarian cancer is discovered late, when the survival rate is as low as 20% to 2

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The Link Between Breast Cancer and Bone Health

It was around this time two years ago when Katie Finley was diagnosed with breast cancer and had a bilateral mastectomy. Before the surgery, doctors told her they didn’t think it was serious, and that they didn’t think she’d need chemotherapy or radiation. However, during the surgery, Finley’s healthcare team removed a few of her lymph nodes (the first place breast cancer typically spreads) and found more cancerous cells than expected. A follow-up scan confirmed the worst: The breast ca

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Think Therapy Is Navel-Gazing? Think Again

By Steven Sandage, Boston UniversityMidway through a recent lecture about my psychology research, a bright graduate student voiced a familiar question.“I have heard psychotherapy makes people more self-absorbed,” they said. “So how can you encourage a practice that has such a negative social impact?”I am often struck by these negative stereotypes, despite growing demand for counseling – particularly amid the pandemic. The well-entrenched image seems to be that psychotherapy is an in

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Midlife Isn’t a Crisis, but Sleep, Stress and Happiness Feel a Little Different After 35 – or Whenever Middle Age Actually Begins

By Soomi Lee, University of South FloridaFewer than one-fifth of Americans say they actually experienced a midlife crisis. And yet there are still some common misunderstandings people have about midlife. I study midlife, and especially how people in this stage of life experience sleep and stress. In my research, I have also found that midlife brings both opportunities and challenges. Are we there yet?Exactly when midlife begins is hard to pin down. Compared with other developmental periods

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How Medical Technology Is Changing Health Care

Grace Fernandez's biggest fear is dying in her sleep. It's a fear that could easily become a reality for the 33-year-old and the approximately 1.6 million other Americans living with Type 1 diabetes. Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disease where the pancreas produces little or no insulin, a hormone needed to allow sugar (glucose) to enter cells to produce energy. People living with the chronic condition face many obstacles, including keeping their blood sugar stable through the night. If a Typ

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What You Eat Can Reprogram Your Genes – an Expert Explains the Emerging Science of Nutrigenomics

By Monica Dus, University of Michigan People typically think of food as calories, energy and sustenance. However, the latest evidence suggests that food also “talks” to our genome, which is the genetic blueprint that directs the way the body functions down to the cellular level. This communication between food and genes may affect your health, physiology and longevity. The idea that food delivers important messages to an animal’s genome is the focus of a field known as nutrigenomi

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The ACA guarantees full contraceptive coverage. Why are women getting denied?

As Whitney* approached the end of her medical residency more than two years ago, she discovered a new birth control device that seemed like a perfect fit for her needs. The contraceptive — a one-year vaginal ring — meant she’d only need one prescription annually instead of the monthly refills required for most hormonal rings. She also liked that the ring didn’t require insertion or removal by a healthcare provider (HCP) like an intrauterine device (IUD). Whitney knew she wanted children

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From Hot Flashes to Night Sweats, a Rundown of Vasomotor Symptoms During Menopause

Stacia Crawford, 54, has been battling night sweats and hot flashes for the past four years. “Some nights I was unable to sleep because I would go from burning up to freezing in a matter of minutes,” she revealed, noting that she’s often changing her sheets several times a week. “There have been times when I have had to sleep in the spare bedroom because the sweats make me so uncomfortable I can't sleep and it disturbed my husband,” she added. “I also keep a change of clothes in my

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Lung Cancer Kills an Alarming Number of Women — But There’s Hope

In 2013, Ivy Elkins started feeling a worsening pain in her neck and an odd pain in her elbow. Eventually, she was unable to even straighten her arm. Her primary care doctor thought it was an overuse injury. X-rays showed nothing unusual, and physical therapy provided no improvement. The then-47-year-old mom of two went to an orthopedist who did an MRI and found that a mass had eaten away her bone. The doctor ordered a biopsy, and Elkins learned she had adenocarcinoma, a type of non-small cell

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Heart to Heart: How Pregnancy Can Affect Your Heart Health Throughout Your Life

On October 28, 2021, HealthyWomen hosted a free webinar, “Heart to Heart: How Pregnancy Can Affect Your Heart Health Throughout Your Life,” in partnership with the American Medical Women’s Association, Preeclampsia Foundation and Preventive Cardiovascular Nurses Association. Watch a recording of the webinar to learn more about the connection between pregnancy and long-term heart health.When 42-year-old Bessie Cherry was pregnant with her son, Arlo, in 2018, she was diagnosed with gestatio

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With Ulcerative Colitis, Honesty Is Everything

Shonda Berry was 14 when she first saw blood where it shouldn’t be. It was the summer before she started high school, and she was at her grandmother’s house with her mother. The three were getting ready to go shopping, but Berry needed a bathroom break first. That’s when she noticed blood in her poop.Berry was scared, but she was also ashamed. “It was embarrassing to me,” she said. “It wasn’t something that was really talked about in my community, so I came out of the bathroom and

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Survey Says: How Women View Health Care and Access to Health Information

These days, health-related insight is a click away. Curious about the symptoms of depression? Google it. Need the definition of collagen? Ask Alexa. Want to know more about women’s reproductive rights? Pick a podcast.But how do women view health care and access to health information? Do age, race and ethnicity play a part? What about education? Our recent survey found some surprising results. (Note: The women quoted in this story did not participate in the survey.)A majority of women agreed t

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Good Sex With Emily Jamea: The Paradox of Desire

Emily Jamea, Ph.D., is a sex therapist, author and podcast host. You can find her here each month to share her latest thoughts about sex."I've lost my libido." "He's never in the mood." "I feel constantly rejected." "It wasn't always like this. We couldn't keep our hands off each other in the honeymoon phase." "I'm in a sexless relationship." "Please, help me increase my desire!" Desire is the most common, yet complex, issue that brings couples to sex therapy. I estimate that 90% of the phone c

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How Becoming My Husband’s Caregiver in My 30s Changed My Life

February 18 is National Caregivers Day. I get the text when I’m at work, trying to focus on a project I’ve barely made any progress on all day. “I’m in the ER,” my husband, Lee, wrote. “But don’t worry, I’m OK.” My hands shake on the drive over to the hospital, but I’m less anxious than I have been in months. Lee’s trip to the ER was close to a year in the making as his already-severe asthma intensified and his reluctance to visit the hospital because of the Covid-19 pa

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Access to Contraceptives

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Why Millions on Medicaid Are at Risk of Losing Coverage in the Months Ahead

By Rachana Pradhan, Kaiser Health NewsThe Biden administration and state officials are bracing for a great unwinding: millions of people losing their Medicaid benefits when the pandemic health emergency ends. Some might sign up for different insurance. Many others are bound to get lost in the transition. State Medicaid agencies for months have been preparing for the end of a federal mandate that anyone enrolled in Medicaid cannot lose coverage during the pandemic.Before the public health crisis

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In Research Studies and in Real Life, Placebos Have a Powerful Healing Effect on the Body and Mind

By Elissa H. Patterson, University of Michigan and Hans Schroder, University of MichiganDid you ever feel your own shoulders relax when you saw a friend receive a shoulder massage? For those of you who said “yes,” congratulations, your brain is using its power to create a “placebo effect.” For those who said “no,” you’re not alone, but thankfully, the brain is trainable. Since the 1800s, the word placebo has been used to refer to a fake treatment, meaning one that does not conta

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50-Year-Old Muscles Just Can’t Grow Big Like They Used to – the Biology of How Muscles Change With Age

By Roger Fielding, Tufts UniversityThere is perhaps no better way to see the absolute pinnacle of human athletic abilities than by watching the Olympics. But at the Winter Games this year – and at almost all professional sporting events – you rarely see a competitor over 40 years old and almost never see a single athlete over 50. This is because with every additional year spent on Earth, bodies age and muscles don’t respond to exercise the same as they used to. I lead a team of scientis

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Despite Its Disastrous Effects, Covid-19 Offers Some Gifts to Medicine — an Immunology Expert Explains What It Can Teach Us About Autoimmune Disease

By Dario Ghersi, University of Nebraska OmahaFor all the misery that the pandemic has wrought, it has also opened up a vast storehouse of knowledge about medical issues beyond COVID-19. While it’s still too early to draw conclusions, evidence is emerging of links between autoimmune disorders and the virus that causes COVID-19. As a bioinformatics researcher with medical training and expertise in immune system modeling, I find this development especially exciting.The immune system is the mos

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Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease

NAFLD is on the rise. Here’s what to know about the disease’s various stages, as well as prevention and treatment guidelines Nicole Pajer Jan 31, 2022 Created With Support nonalcoholic fatty liver disease and nonalcoholic steatohepatitis

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Bystander CPR Saved My Husband’s Life

February is American Heart Month.Fifteen years ago in February, the month our nation dedicates to cardiovascular health for American Heart Month, my 34-year-old husband had a cardiac arrest in front of me. Two months earlier, just before Christmas, our first son had been born. We'd been navigating the upside-down days and nights of new parenting and felt ready for an adventure. On President's Day weekend, we headed to a nearby trail so my husband, Ed, could run and I could follow behind with th

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A Guide to Living With IBD

Living with IBD can affect so much of your life. Symptoms come and go unpredictably, sometimes making it difficult to have an active social life or intimate relationship. Struggles with body image, along with anxiety and depression, can take a toll on mental health.Our new education program provides advice to help you take charge of the condition and live life to the fullest. Easy-to-follow infographics offer tips on “Managing the Social and Emotional Effects of Life With Inflammatory Bowel D

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Living With RVVC

Most women — 75% — will get a vaginal yeast infection at some point in their lives. And, a small number will experience recurrent vulvovaginal candidiasis (RVVC) — a chronic yeast infection that comes back three or more times in a year. Learn the facts about chronic yeast infection — and get some tips that can help.This resource was created with support from Mycovia Pharmaceuticals, Inc.Fast Facts: What You Need to Know About Recurrent Vulvovaginal Candidiasis (Chronic Yeast Infection)T

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Ready for Another Pandemic Malady? It’s Called ‘Decision Fatigue’

By Jenny Gold, Kaiser Health NewsMost all of us have felt the exhaustion of pandemic-era decision-making. Should I travel to see an elderly relative? Can I see my friends and, if so, is inside OK? Mask or no mask? Test or no test? What day? Which brand? Is it safe to send my child to day care?Questions that once felt trivial have come to bear the moral weight of a life-or-death choice. So it might help to know (as you’re tossing and turning over whether to cancel your non-refundable vacation)

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December Policy Roundup

1. The White House hosted the first Maternal Health Day of Action On Tuesday December 7, 2021, Vice President Kamala Harris hosted the first-ever White House Maternal Health Day of Action. Harris highlighted federal efforts and recommendations to reduce maternal mortality, such as proposals to create universal screening for maternal mental health conditions, extending pregnancy-related Medicaid coverage for a full year postpartum, designating “birthing-friendly” hospitals and passing the

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Información resumida: Lo que los padres deben saber sobre la meningitis B

La Dra. Karen Bonnie hizo la revisión médica de este documentoLa meningitis B es una enfermedad poco frecuente pero grave causada por la bacteria Neisseria meningitidis. La meningitis bacteriana es causada por cinco grupos de Neisseria meningitidis: A, B, C, W e Y.La meningitis puede causar una infección de la cobertura protectora del cerebro y de la médula espinal o una infección de la sangre conocida como septicemia.La bacteria que causa la meningitis B se esparce cuando un portador o un

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A Conversation With Nina Coslov About Perimenopause

In her early 40s, Nina Coslov started experiencing symptoms of perimenopause, but she was still having regular menstrual periods. When she couldn’t get answers from her healthcare providers, she co-founded Women Living Better, an organization dedicated to improving women’s understanding of the path to menopause through research and education. She harnessed her science background to become the lead author on “Symptom Experience During the Late Reproductive Stage and the Menopausal Transiti

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New Insights From Biology Can Help Overcome Siloed Thinking in Cancer Clinical Trials and Treatment

By Gerald Denis, Boston UniversityRarely does an oncologist closely question a breast cancer patient about their blood glucose, body weight, lipid profile, or medications for diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Instead, these issues are usually the concern of the patient’s primary care provider. Medical experts have recognized that obesity, defined as a body mass index of 30 or greater, increases the risk of several cancers. They include cancers of the breast, esophagus, kidney, gallbladde

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There Is Much More to Mindfulness Than the Popular Media Hype

By Pierce Salguero, Penn StateMindfulness is seemingly everywhere these days. A Google search I conducted in January 2022 for the term “mindfulness” resulted in almost 3 billion hits. The practice is now routinely offered in workplaces, schools, psychologists’ offices and hospitals all across the country. Most of the public enthusiasm for mindfulness stems from the reputation it has for reducing stress. But scholars and researchers who work on mindfulness, and the Buddhist tradition its

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Preguntas para el médico de su hijo sobre la meningitis B

La Dra. Shelley Kim hizo la revisión médica de este documentoLa meningitis B es una enfermedad poco frecuente pero grave causada por la bacteria Neisseria meningitidis. Cualquier persona puede enfermarse de meningitis B, pero los índices de la enfermedad son mayores durante la adolescencia, teniendo la mayor incidencia los adolescentes y adultos jóvenes de entre 16 y 23 años. La meningitis B puede causar una infección de la cobertura protectora del cerebro y de la médula espinal o una in

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Your Guide to NASH

What you need to know about nonalcoholic steatohepatitis, a nonalcoholic fatty liver disease Did you know that liver disease is not always related to alcohol? In fact, up to 25% of people in the United States are affected by nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), a group of liver conditions in people who drink little to no alcohol. Nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) is an aggressive and more severe form of NAFLD that causes liver swelling and cell damage. With NASH cases on the rise — the

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A Parent’s Guide to Meningitis B

Did you know that meningitis rates are highest in babies younger than 1 and teens and young adults ages 16 to 23? Although it’s rare, meningitis B can strike otherwise healthy people without warning, progress quickly and be fatal — sometimes within 24 hours. That’s why it’s critical to learn the risks, signs, symptoms and steps you can take to protect your loved ones from getting this infectious disease. We provide expert guidance on the important vaccines that all children and youn

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Fast Facts: What You Need to Know About Recurrent Vulvovaginal Candidiasis (Chronic Yeast Infection)

Medically reviewed by Dr. Mary Jane Minkin They’re itchy, annoying and sometimes painful. They’re also very common in women, but no one really wants to talk about them: yeast infections. The technical term for these infections is vulvovaginal candidiasis (VVC), and they’re caused by an overgrowth of the fungus Candida, usually Candida albicans, often referred to as yeast. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), about 75% of women will get VVC at least once

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Enfermedad de hígado graso no alcohólico

La incidencia de EHGNA está aumentando. Esto es lo que debe saber sobre las distintas etapas de la enfermedad, así como sobre las recomendaciones de prevención y tratamiento. Nicole Pajer Jan 31, 2022 Created With Support nonalcoholic fatty liver disease and nonalcoholic steatohepatitis

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Living With RVVC

Most women — 75% — will get a vaginal yeast infection at some point in their lives. And, a small number will experience recurrent vulvovaginal candidiasis (RVVC) — a chronic yeast infection that comes back three or more times in a year. Learn the facts about chronic yeast infection — and get some tips that can help. This resource was created with support from Mycovia Pharmaceuticals, Inc. Fast Facts: What You Need to Know About Recurrent Vulvovaginal Candidiasis (Chronic Yeast

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My Son Didn’t Commit a Crime When He Took His Own Life

As told to Nicole Audrey SpectorOn the day he died in 2016, my 20-year-old son, Austin, sounded like he was on top of the world. Talking with me over FaceTime, he gushed about his upcoming weekend plans, which included watching the Notre Dame game with his college buddies. “I love you, Mom,” he said, wrapping up the call so he could head out to get burgers with the guys. “I’ll talk to you on Sunday.” For me, my husband (Austin’s dad) and our 17-year-old daughter, it was an uneventfu

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End-of-Life Conversations Can Be Hard, but Your Loved Ones Will Thank You

By Deborah Carr, Boston UniversityDeath – along with taxes – is one of life’s few certainties. Despite this inevitability, most people dread thinking and talking about when, how or under what conditions they might die. They don’t want to broach the topic with family, either, for fear of upsetting them. Ironically, though, talking about death “early and often” can be the greatest gift to bestow on loved ones.As a sociologist who has studied end-of-life issues for more than two deca

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Can Acupuncture Help?

After Julia Métraux was left with chronic pain after a car accident, a pain specialist suggested she try acupuncture to ease her symptoms. Though she’d never considered acupuncture as a medical treatment before, Julia decided to try it and saw an acupuncturist weekly for two months. Julia was relieved when her full-body pain eased and only remained in areas directly affected by whiplash from the accident. While acupuncture may only be recently entering the mainstream, the practice itself

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Good Sex With Emily Jamea: Sexual Fantasies

Emily Jamea, Ph.D., is a sex therapist, author and podcast host. You can find her here each month to share her latest thoughts about sex.Have you ever dreamt of what it would be like to win the lottery? I know I have. It feels good to imagine who you’d share your winnings with, where you’d go on vacation and what you’d do with extra leisure time.Have you ever allowed yourself to imagine how it would feel to take revenge on someone who betrayed you? I’ll admit — I’ve done that too. O

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Stress Is Contagious in Relationships – Here’s What You Can Do to Support Your Partner and Boost Your Own Health During the Holidays and Beyond

By Rosie Shrout, Purdue UniversityWith the flurry of shopping, spending money and traveling to see family, stress can feel inevitable during the holidays. You might already know stress can affect your own health, but what you may not realize is that your stress – and how you manage it – is catching. Your stress can spread around, particularly to your loved ones. As a social-health psychologist, I have developed a model on how partners and their stress influence each other’s psychologica

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Finding My Birth Mother Changed My Life — and the Way I Manage My Health Care

When I was a child, my stepmother told me I had another pair of parents who lived up a beanstalk. My mother had tried to plant her seeds in the soil, but a baby never grew, so my dad and mom climbed the stalk and asked my parents if they could spare a child. “Can I meet my beanstalk parents?” I asked her. “No,” she replied. “The beanstalk was cut down. There is no way for you to reach them.” As an adoptee, I grappled with a sense of not belonging throughout my childhood and carried

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Love Conquers All: My Journey as the Mother of a Transgender Daughter

As told to Nicole PajerJane has always been loving, sweet, funny and creative with a huge heart. In her prepubescent years, before she came out as transgender, she became very shy, closed off and withdrawn. Her father and I became concerned because she was spending a lot of time alone in her room. We maintained an open dialogue with her, but she didn’t quite understand what she was experiencing and couldn’t articulate her emotions. I knew my child was struggling emotionally and socially, an

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Rifts Between Older Mothers and Their Adult Children Usually Endure – Even Through Divorce, Illness and Death

By Megan Gilligan, Iowa State UniversityAt the start of every new year, individuals often make resolutions to change aspects of their lives that they find undesirable. For some, these promises to themselves may involve trying to mend broken family relationships. Well-meaning friends and family members may encourage estranged older parents or adult children to reconnect with one another as well. I study family estrangement, and specifically estrangement between mothers and adult children. Alon

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10 Reasons to Try a Dry January

January is almost here, and you know what that means: Dry January, a month free of alcohol, is almost here too. To prepare, we did some leg work to find out how a booze-free month can help you. We found that abstaining from drinking alcohol for 31 days can not only benefit your mind and your body but also your wallet. Alcohol Change UK, the organization that started the increasingly popular sobriety challenge in 2013, reported that 65% of those who participate cited improved health, 70% reporte

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Self-Care Sunday Series

Everyone makes resolutions for the new year but by the end of January, many of us have already let our resolutions slide. We asked HealthyWomen Women Health Advisory Council member Rachel Sufczynski, MSES, CEP, if we should even make New Year’s resolutions and if we do, how to motivate ourselves, particularly in the cold, dark months of winter. Tune in for Rachel’s expert responses to these questions and more in the first of our #SelfCare Sunday video series. And be sure to check back ea

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Biden to Expand Access to At-Home Covid Kits: 4 Essential Reads on the Critical Role of Rapid Tests

By Matt Williams, The ConversationPresident Joe Biden has outlined plans to massively ramp up COVID-19 testing in an effort to curb – or at least slow – the spread of the highly infectious omicron variant across the U.S.In a speech on Dec. 21, 2021, Biden said he aimed to get out “as many tests, as quickly as possible” and said free at-home kits would be sent out to Americans beginning in January.At the forefront of the push against the omicron variant will be new federal testing site

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Rifts Between Older Mothers and Their Adult Children Usually Endure – Even Through Divorce, Illness and Death

By Megan Gilligan, Iowa State University At the start of every new year, individuals often make resolutions to change aspects of their lives that they find undesirable. For some, these promises to themselves may involve trying to mend broken family relationships. Well-meaning friends and family members may encourage estranged older parents or adult children to reconnect with one another as well. I study family estrangement, and specifically estrangement between mothers and adult children.

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I Came Out on Christmas Eve

As told to Alexandra FrostAs a child, when I watched shows with my mom and LGBTQ characters came on the screen, she would stick out her tongue in disgust and make a disapproving sound. At our Catholic church, where my family was deeply devoted, I listened, confused, to the ideologies: I didn’t understand why God would hate someone who loved someone of the same gender. These influences, among others, meant that I would spend my teen years, during which I identified as bisexual, hiding the trut

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Ask the Expert About Bone Health Videos

Why do women have higher rates of osteoporosis? What strength training exercises are considered safe for osteoporosis? How does food affect your bones? What are some examples of bone healthy foods? How does osteoporosis put you at risk for vertebral compression fractures (VCF)? What are some treatment options for VCFs? Can you prevent VCFs? This resource was created with support from Medtronic.

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The US Doesn’t Have Enough Faculty to Train the Next Generation of Nurses

By Rayna M. Letourneau, University of South FloridaDespite a national nursing shortage in the United States, over 80,000 qualified applications were not accepted at U.S. nursing schools in 2020, according to the American Association of Colleges of Nursing. This was due primarily to a shortage of nursing professors and a limited number of clinical placements where nursing students get practical job training. Additional constraints include a shortage of experienced practitioners to provide supe

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How Healthcare Providers and Patients Can Limit the Spread of Antimicrobial Resistance

Español Korin Reid had known about antibiotic resistance since early childhood. From as young as age seven, she recalls reading about it in one of her parents' books, so when she got her first antibiotic-resistant infection (a bacterial infection that some antibiotics can’t treat), "I was kind of annoyed,” said Reid, a data scientist and CEO of Ellison Laboratories. “I've been very cautious about not taking antibiotics when I don't need them." Reid is one of the 2.8 millio

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Fast Facts: 10 Facts About Osteoporosis in Women

Reviewed by Ivy Alexander, Ph.D.Osteoporosis is a disease that results from poor-quality bone tissue, which causes the bones to be weak, thin and brittle. This makes it more likely that fractures will occur. Although anyone can develop this disease, it is more common in women than in men. Of the estimated 10 million Americans with osteoporosis, about 80% are women. A woman is more likely to develop osteoporosis than a man because women tend to have smaller, thinner bones; lower levels of tes

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Putting Yourself on the A-List

The year is coming to a close, and it’s that season when many of us are reflecting on the 12 months now behind us while looking forward to the next 12 coming up. Whether you’re big on New Year’s resolutions or not, there is undoubtedly value in occasionally taking stock. Year’s end is as good a time as any. As I go through this practice myself, I know that one of my biggest priorities for 2022 is putting myself on the A-list. And no, this isn’t because I’ve suddenly become outrageou

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A Conversation With Dr. Sarah Psutka About Bladder Cancer

This interview was edited for clarity and length.Urothelial bladder cancer (UBC) is cancer of the lining of the urinary system. More commonly referred to as “bladder cancer,” it begins in urothelial cells, which line the inside of the bladder and other parts of the urinary tract. These cells overgrow and form a tumor. Although this type of cancer occurs most often in the bladder, it can occur anywhere that urothelial cells are present, including the urethra, ureters and kidneys. HealthyWome

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Good Sex With Emily Jamea: The Burden of Sexual Shame

Emily Jamea, Ph.D. is a sex therapist, author and podcast host. You can find her here each month to share her latest thoughts about sex. Jessie and her husband sat across from me holding hands. “I don’t know what happened,” she said. “Things were great in the beginning. We couldn’t keep our hands off each other.” She looked at him, and he gave her hand a little squeeze, encouraging her to go on. “I don’t know what changed, but I have no desire anymore.” “A lot of people

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How Effective Are Vaccines Against Omicron? An Epidemiologist Answers 6 Questions

By Melissa Hawkins, American UniversityThe pandemic has brought many tricky terms and ideas from epidemiology into everyone’s lives. Two particularly complicated concepts are vaccine efficacy and effectiveness. These are not the same thing. And as time goes on and new variants like omicron emerge, they are changing, too. Melissa Hawkins is an epidemiologist and public health researcher at American University. She explains the way researchers calculate how well a vaccine prevents disease, wh

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Cómo los proveedores de atención médica y los pacientes pueden limitar la propagación de la resistencia a los antimicrobianos

Korin Reid sabía sobre la resistencia a los antibióticos desde que era pequeña. Desde los siete años, recuerda haber leído sobre eso en uno de los libros de sus padres, así que cuando contrajo su primera infección resistente a los antibióticos (una infección bacteriana que algunos antibióticos no pueden tratar), "estaba un poco molesta", dijo Korin, científica de datos y directora ejecutiva de Ellison Laboratories. "He tenido mucho cuidado de no tomar antibióticos cuando no los nece

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Mourning After Mass Shootings Isn’t Enough – a Sociologist Argues That Society’s Messages About Masculinity Need to Change

By Darcie Vandegrift, Drake UniversityToday, Dec. 14, marks the anniversary of the tragic loss of children and teachers at Sandy Hook. After any mass shooting, Americans hear politicians make the ritualistic call for “thoughts and prayers.” Yet years after the killing of these 20 elementary students and six staff, school shootings continue to frequently claim young lives, most recently in Oxford, Michigan. There have been more than 30 in the U.S. during 2021 alone – and more than 600 ma

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HIV Prevention Pill PrEP Is Now Free Under Most Insurance Plans – but the Latest Challenge to the Affordable Care Act Puts This Benefit at Risk

December 1 is World AIDS Day By Paul Shafer, Boston University and Kristefer Stojanovski, Tulane University Since the start of the HIV epidemic in 1981, over 700,000 Americans have lost their lives to AIDS. Being infected used to be a death sentence. But now, 40 years later, the U.S. is on the precipice of eradicating HIV. The U.S. Ending the HIV Epidemic initiative provides a road map to reduce new HIV infections by 90% by 2030. A key preventive strategy in this plan is preexpos

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Legislator Toolkit:Resources for Strengthening Families and Communities: Improving Access to Treatment for Substance Use Disorders

This toolkit is intended to help state legislators (and others) interested in addressing the opioid epidemic in the U.S. The toolkit was jointly developed by HealthyWomen and the Legal Action Center and is partially based upon a presentation we made at a Women in Government Conference in June 2018.The opioid epidemic has many components and causes. To address it requires multiple approaches and collaborations. Each region, state and community must consider its own situation in developing and im

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Esclerosis múltiple: Qué esperar desde el diagnóstico hasta el tratamiento

Candice Morgan pensó que sus episodios de mareo se debían a hambre o cansancio. Esta profesional de informática de Detroit, Michigan, se hizo una prueba de embarazo, aunque sabía que no estaba embarazada. Diez días después, fue al hospital, donde los médicos le hicieron una tomografía computarizada y la mantuvieron durante la noche en observación. Al día siguiente, los doctores ordenaron una resonancia magnética y confirmaron su diagnóstico: Morgan tenía esclerosis múltiple. Le fa

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Datos curiosos: Lo que debe saber sobre la resistencia a los antimicrobianos (AMR)

La Dra. Elizabeth Asiago-Reddy hizo la revisión de este documento. Los antimicrobianos son medicamentos que se utilizan para prevenir y tratar infecciones causadas por bacterias, virus, hongos y parásitos que se encuentran en humanos, animales y plantas.Los antimicrobianos incluyen antibióticos, antivirales, antifúngicos y antiparasitarios. Han salvado millones de vidas y son uno de los avances médicos más importantes de la historia. La resistencia a los antimicrobianos (AMR, por sus sigl

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Why Addressing Racism Against Black Women in Health Care Is Key to Ending the US HIV Epidemic

By Nabila El-Bassel, Columbia UniversityForty years into the HIV/AIDS epidemic, Black women continue to bear the highest burden of HIV among women.Although Black women represent only 13% of the female population, they accounted for over half of HIV diagnoses among all females in the U.S. in 2018, according to data from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. White women, who are 62% of the female population, accounted for 21% of HIV diagnoses. Black women are also less likely tha

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Colorful Sweets May Look Tasty, but Some Researchers Question Whether Synthetic Dyes May Pose Health Risks to Your Colon and Rectum

By Lorne J. Hofseth, University of South CarolinaEarly-onset colorectal cancer incidence among the young, defined as those under age 50, has been rising globally since the early 1990s. Rates for colon and rectal cancers are expected to increase by 90% and 124%, respectively, by 2030.One suspected reason behind this trend is increased global consumption of a Westernized diet that consists heavily of red and processed meats, added sugar and refined grains. Sixty percent of the Standard American

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A Conversation With Dr. Sarah Psutka About Bladder Cancer

This interview was edited for clarity and length.Urothelial bladder cancer (UBC) is cancer of the lining of the urinary system. More commonly referred to as “bladder cancer,” it begins in urothelial cells, which line the inside of the bladder and other parts of the urinary tract. These cells overgrow and form a tumor. Although this type of cancer occurs most often in the bladder, it can occur anywhere that urothelial cells are present, including the urethra, ureters and kidneys. HealthyWome

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Can You Hear Me and Other People With Disabilities?

December 3 is the International Day of Persons With Disabilities.On this year’s International Day of Persons With Disabilities, I look back on a pivotal day in my childhood that transformed how I saw myself and my cerebral palsy.Saturdays were special. As a kid growing up in the suburbs of New York, Saturdays meant Burger King outings with my grandparents, a great big slice of trademarked Hershey’s chocolate pie for me and piping hot oatmeal for them. And we can’t forget about the Happy M

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Más allá de lo físico: Cómo la artritis psoriásica puede afectar tu salud mental y sexual

Todos los días, durante todo el día, Cynthia Covert tiene que pensar sobre cuánto dolor le causará cada actividad. “¿Vale la pena? ¿Qué puedo hacer para minimizar el dolor?” son preguntas que debe hacerse a sí misma antes de realizar actividades que la mayoría de nosotros damos por sentado. Esto se debe a que vive con artritis psoriásica (PsA, por sus siglas en inglés), una enfermedad autoinmune inflamatoria crónica que puede ser dolorosa y suele causar dolor en las articulacion

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I Fought Generational Obesity by Creating My Own Road Map to a Healthier, Happier Life

As told to Marnie GoodfriendI can’t recall a single childhood memory that wasn’t affected by obesity. As a 101-pound kindergartener, I remember my mom being upset when my school sent home one of those little school pictures with my weight underneath it, and I was the only child whose weight had three digits in it. The rest of the year, the number was blank under my school photos, which taught me early on to associate shame with my body.I come from generational obesity where everyone in my f

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La artritis psoriásica aumenta el riesgo de sufrir otros problemas de salud

Al igual que muchas estrellas de programas de televisión antes que ella, Meg Maley, concursante en el programa El Gran Hermano 2015, guardaba un secreto. Cuando los espectadores se preguntaban por qué una joven aparentemente sana tenía tan mal desempeño durante las pruebas físicas y en ocasiones se la veía tomar medicamentos, Maley no comentó nada al respecto. Solo cuando su temporada del show había acabado, Maley reveló su secreto: Ella padecía de psoriasis y artritis psoriásica (Ps

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Psoriatic Arthritis Can Put You at Risk for Other Health Problems

Like many reality TV stars before her, 2015 Big Brother contestant Meg Maley was keeping a secret. When viewers wondered why a seemingly healthy young woman did so poorly during physical competitions and was sometimes seen taking pills, Maley kept silent. It wasn't until after her season of the show ended that Maley revealed her secret: She had psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis (PsA).While many people think of psoriasis as a skin condition, it's actually a chronic autoimmune disease that can le

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Clinically Speaking: Important Questions to Ask About Antimicrobial Resistance

Medically reviewed by Dr. Chad Sanborn Decades of overuse and misuse of antimicrobials has led to the global health threat known as antimicrobial resistance (AMR), which is when germs change over time and no longer respond to common medications. This makes infections harder to treat or not treatable at all. Each year, more than 2.8 million antibiotic-resistant infections occur in the United States alone, and more than 35,000 people die as a result of AMR. The situation has become so dire t

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Living with Psoriasis My Entire Life, I Knew I Could Develop Psoriatic Arthritis

As told to Erica RimlingerMy grandmother had psoriasis, an auto-immune condition that affects the skin. Although it can be inherited, none of her children have it, none of my 10 cousins have it, and none of my three brothers and sisters have it. But I do.In fact, I've been living with it for such a long time I don't remember not living with it. But my journey with psoriatic arthritis (PsA) began just last year. PsA is a form of arthritis that can affect people who have psoriasis, and although i

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Clinically Speaking: Questions to Ask Your HCP About Psoriatic Arthritis

Medically reviewed by Dr. Stuart KaplanPsoriatic arthritis (PsA) is a chronic disease of the joints, and it can be a tricky illness to navigate. But it's extremely important to get it under control because living with chronic pain can feel devastating and cause long-term damage. Although early diagnosis matters for treatment, people don't always get help quickly. This is often the result of a lack of education about the condition. In addition, without a specific test that can diagnose PsA, the

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All About Psoriatic Arthritis

Psoriatic arthritis (PsA) is an inflammatory form of arthritis where the immune system attacks healthy tissue and causes joint pain, stiffness and swelling. Early diagnosis can keep the disease from progressing, potentially preventing irreversible joint damage and permanent disability — and lower your risk of developing other conditions, such as diabetes, obesity and cardiovascular disease, that can go along with it.As Tina Jamerson Hopkins explained to HealthyWomen, "The key about PsA is to

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Listen to Healthcare Providers, but Trust Your Body and Yourself

As told to Liz Sauchelli When I was 30, I woke up one morning unable to move a single joint in my body. I'd gone to sleep the night before feeling unwell, but I didn't think much of it. I was still recovering from the birth of my third child, and it had been a difficult one. I'd needed a blood transfusion, and in the 10 months since, my body had remained weak. But that morning was completely different. I couldn't make a fist to brush my teeth. I couldn't bend my knees or my hips. I had no

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A New, Lower Threshold for Lead Poisoning in Children Means More Kids Will Get Tested – but the Ultimate Solution Is Eliminating Lead Sources

Gabriel Filippelli, IUPUI The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has updated its blood lead reference value – the level at which children ages 1-5 are considered to have high exposure to lead. Since 2012, this threshold had been set at 5 micrograms of lead per deciliter of blood; children at or above this level represented the top 2.5% with the highest blood lead levels in the nation. Now, in response to recent federal health surveys, the CDC has updated that number t

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Beyond the Physical: How Psoriatic Arthritis Can Affect Your Mental and Sexual Health

Every day, all throughout the day, Cynthia Covert has to think about how much pain any given activity will cause her. "Is it worth it? What can I do to minimize the pain?" she must ask herself before performing activities most of us take for granted. That's because she lives with psoriatic arthritis (PsA), a chronic inflammatory autoimmune disease that can be painful and can cause joint pain, swelling, stiffness, diminished range of motion, nail changes, rashes and fatigue."Psoriatic arthritis

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Unvaccinated? Don’t Count on Leaving Your Family Death Benefits

By Michelle Andrews, Kaiser Health NewsThese days, workers who refuse to get vaccinated against covid-19 may face financial repercussions, from higher health insurance premiums to loss of their jobs. Now, the financial fallout might follow workers beyond the grave. If they die of covid and weren't vaccinated, their families may not get death benefits they would otherwise have received. New York's Metropolitan Transportation Authority no longer pays a $500,000 death benefit to the families of su

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What You Need to Know About Diabetes

November is National Diabetes Awareness Month.I was 8 years old when my Girl Scout leader told the troop that I got diabetes from eating too much cake.I remember my face heating up as my friends stared at me. I had just returned to my new "normal" after a week in the hospital, and this was the first time I'd heard the cake theory. I struggled to remember the last time I even had cake.When my mother picked me up from the meeting, I asked her if it was true. She grabbed my hand and led me back in

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I’m an Infectious Disease Doctor. Yes, I’m Vaccinating Our 5-Year-Old Against Covid-19. Here Is Why You Should Too.

Alexander Wong, University of SaskatchewanI am an infectious disease physician. When it is our turn to vaccinate our five-year-old son against COVID-19, I will do so with confidence and without hesitation. I am encouraging every parent with eligible children between ages five and 11 to do the same. Here is why.The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) recently authorized the Pfizer-BioNTech vaccine for children between five and 11 years of age. Subsequently, members of the Centers for Disea

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New Moms Are Busy Checking on Their Babies. But Is Anyone Checking on Them?

A lot of time and effort goes into preparing for the birth of a baby — but the plan for what happens when the baby comes home doesn't get nearly as much attention. Life changes instantly with the arrival of a new baby and a new mom's mental health is not always prioritized during that time (the 12 weeks after the baby is born known as the "fourth trimester") or beyond. Having a baby is supposed to be the happiest time of a mom's life. But in reality, some moms may experience the "baby blues."

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A Survey About You, Your Health & Your Needs

Here at HealthyWomen we've got you on our minds. Our goal is to provide you with the highest-quality information about the health topics that affect you most. We're always looking to improve what we do, so we created this survey to help us get to know you better and learn what information you want and need to be at your healthiest. Your answers will guide us as we continue to refine and improve the content we create. Thank you, in advance, for participating! We are so grateful. —Team Health

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Bleeding Disorders and Women: Could You Be at Risk?

Although bleeding disorders are not as widely recognized in women as in men, they do occur. While women and men have similar symptoms, women can experience added complications throughout their lifetime. That's why it's critical that women know the symptoms, get a diagnosis and take steps to getting treatment. Tune into our "Bleeding Disorders and Women: Could You Be at Risk?" Facebook Live series to hear from leading experts and real women living with bleeding disorders on topics includin

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How a Cervical Cancer Diagnosis in My 20s Taught Me How to Live

As told to Liz SauchelliWhen I was younger, I wanted to be the next Oprah. As a broadcaster, my mind was always on the next story or package to produce. At 25, after years of freelancing, I'd finally landed a full-time job with health benefits and I felt like I was on my way in life.That changed after a routine visit to a gynecologist when I was diagnosed with stage IIA cervical cancer and told I had to have a radical hysterectomy. At that point, it had been around four years since I'd had a Pa

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As a Journalist Who Was an Early Domestic Violence Victim, Writing and Teaching Have Been the Best Medicine

October is National Domestic Violence Awareness Month.He was a lawyer with a red Alfa Romeo, a 7 handicap in golf and a new two-bedroom condo in a leafy Washington, D.C. suburb.I was a banking and pensions reporter with a spotty driving record, a shopping problem, and a studio apartment in an iffy D.C. neighborhood.While our differences could have kept us apart, drinking brought us together. It took nearly four years, three violent assaults and a multistate escape before it officially tore us a

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Want to Manage Postsurgical Pain Without Opioids? There Are Other Options.

Dipal Shah had an emergency delivery for her baby. She was put under anesthesia during the complex procedure and awoke in tremendous pain. "I kept pushing the morphine push button. The nurse had to stop me," the 45-year-old recalled. "They wanted me to take opioids, but after the first day, I was throwing up and nauseated immediately. I couldn't function." Shah then switched to ibuprofen, which she used throughout her 12-week recovery.Many doctors are quick to give women like Shah opioids post-

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Managing Postsurgical Pain

A swift and smooth recovery after surgery is critical for anyone, but it's especially crucial for women, who are likely to be managing many different responsibilities. While there's a time and place for opioids, there are non-opioid pain management options to treat acute pain after common surgeries for women, like hysterectomies, mastectomies, breast reconstruction and cesarean sections (C-sections).In our new education program, we help you understand effective non-opioid options and how to tal

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Breast Surgery and Opioids: What You Need to Know

Erica Rimlinger didn't know what to expect after her mastectomy. But she was feeling pretty anxious about the level of pain she'd be forced to experience."My doctor gave me diazepam [a non-opioid medication used for anxiety, muscle spasms or seizures] to relax before I came to the hospital," she recalled. "And then, before they put me under, they had to do a procedure that I wasn't expecting." The procedure was a breast biopsy, which involved a needle piercing her nipple.She continued, "The pai

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September Policy Roundup

1. Advancing NIH Research on the Health of WomenHealthyWomen is working to inform the National Institute of Health's (NIH) upcoming meeting "Advancing NIH Research on the Health of Women: A 2021 Conference" by providing comments on the effort. HealthyWomen identified major challenges and opportunities that exist to address rising maternal morbidity and mortality rates, chronic debilitating conditions in women and stagnant cervical cancer survival rates. We also included the stories of real wome

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‘Down to My Last Diaper’: The Anxiety of Parenting in Poverty

By Jenny Gold, Kaiser Health NewsFor parents living in poverty, “diaper math" is a familiar and distressingly pressing daily calculation. Babies in the U.S. go through six to 10 disposable diapers a day, at an average cost of $70 to $80 a month. Name-brand diapers with high-end absorption sell for as much as a half a dollar each, and can result in upwards of $120 a month in expenses. One in every three American families cannot afford enough diapers to keep their infants and toddlers clean, d

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The Intersections of Weight Stigma, Mental Wellbeing & Health Disparities

This briefing will educate Congressional staff and others on the negative consequences of weight stigma in the U.S. and ways the organization is tackling this issue through their Reclaim Your Wellness campaign in partnership with the Black Women's Health Imperative. Hear from leading experts about your risk factors, how to talk to your healthcare provider and the lifestyle choices you can make right now to keep your heart healthy as you age. Moderator: Lesli Foster, Evening News Anchor

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Celebrating Every Body Requires Access to the Best Weight-Management Care

If you've gained weight during the Covid-19 pandemic, you are not alone. A year into the pandemic, an American Psychological Association survey showed that 45% of women report undesired weight gain, with an average addition of 22 pounds. Gaining weight can make us feel insecure about our appearance or uncomfortable in pants we may have easily worn before. And there's no shortage of shame or stigma when it comes to our weight. But weight alone is not the best measure of health, and weight stigma

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Kids With Obesity Need Acceptance From Family and Friends, Not Just Better Diet Tips, to Succeed at Managing Their Weight

By Amanda Harrist, Oklahoma State University and Laura Hubbs-Tait, Oklahoma State University Hundreds of programs over the past four decades – from the removal of junk food from school vending machines to Michelle Obama's “Let's Move" campaign – have tried to get kids in the U.S. to eat healthier food and exercise more often. But none of these efforts lowered national child obesity rates. In fact, child obesity has continued to increase. This has been particularly true during the

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It Wasn’t Muscle Damage: It Was Four Fractures and Osteoporosis

As told to Liz SauchelliIt had been two weeks since I'd slipped on the front stairs of my home and my back was still in excruciating pain. The emergency room doctor I'd seen after my fall thought I had muscle damage and had sprained my back. He prescribed anti-inflammatories and painkillers without taking an X-ray. At the time, I thought I was in too much pain for it to be a sprain, but I took his word and went home.Over the next two weeks, it got to the point where I couldn't even sleep in my

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HealthyWomen Is a Proud Convener on the COVID-19 Vaccine Education and Equity Project (CVEEP)

The COVID-19 Vaccine Education and Equity Project (CVEEP) was established in December 2020 by the Alliance for Aging Research, HealthyWomen and the National Caucus and Center on Black Aging, Inc. The project is composed of more than 200 leading organizations representing patient, provider, employer and public health organizations. This group has been convening dialogue among organizations representing the multitude of constituencies that face challenges from COVID-19, including diverse commun

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Heart To Heart: How Pregnancy Can Affect Your Heart Health Throughout Your Life

Did you know heart disease is the leading cause of death among women in the United States? Far too many women think of heart disease as a man's issue — but that couldn't be further from the truth. In fact, risk factors in pregnancy, such as gestational diabetes, preeclampsia, peripartum cardiomyopathy and preterm birth, along with autoimmune and other chronic diseases, can impact your heart health throughout your life. Hear from leading experts about your risk factors, how to talk to you

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Children With Disabilities Face Special Back-to-School Challenges

By Heidi de Marco, Kaiser Health NewsLOS ANGELES — Christopher Manzo, a boy with curly brown hair and bright-blue-and-yellow glasses, has lived a third of his five years at home because of the pandemic. And he is more than ready for kindergarten.Hand in hand with his mother, Martha Manzo, he walks into the Blind Children's Center, a low-rise building nestled among apartment complexes in East Hollywood. In the brightly colored hallway, filled with paintings of animals, Manzo kneels to hug Chri

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Simple Safety Tips for Trick-or-Treating After Fauci Greenlighted Halloween 2021

By Meg Sorg, Purdue UniversityThe air is getting chillier, pumpkins are perched on porches and kids across the country are planning their spooky costumes. As a professor of pediatric nursing and a mom to four young children, I know the excitement and anxiety that pandemic holidays bring to children and parents alike. Halloween 2020 brought creative ways to trick or treat while minimizing the spread of infection (candy catapult, anyone?). But scientists have since determined that the risk of

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Let’s Talk About Osteoporosis

Did you know that one in two women will break a bone in their lifetime as a result of osteoporosis? That makes the condition, which causes bones to become brittle and fragile, a greater risk than breast cancer, heart attack and stroke — combined. At HealthyWomen, we want to help you better understand osteoporosis, why it's more common in women than men, and the questions you should ask your healthcare provider about prevention, treatment, tests and more. While women who are experiencing me

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Yes, We Should Be Keeping the Healthier Hand-Washing Habits We Developed at the Start of the Pandemic

By Melissa Hawkins, American UniversityPeople were washing their hands so much early in the pandemic that sensitive skin and soap shortages were common problems in 2020. All this focus on hand-washing was for good reason. The science uniformly demonstrates that frequent hand-washing reduces the risk of a variety of illnesses. It is low-hanging fruit in terms of an easy, healthy habit to practice. However, people today aren't washing their hands as often as at the beginning of the pandemic, a

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Hypertension Forced Me to Have My Baby Preterm. There Were No Warning Signs.

As told to Nicole Audrey SpectorAs a maternal fetal medicine nurse, I'm used to running around from one patient to the next. But on that day in December 2012, the floor was unusually quiet. So I figured, "What the heck? May as well go have my fetal stress test done."Just shy of 36 weeks pregnant, I had another eight days to go before my pregnancy would be full-term. I expected my blood pressure reading to be normal because I felt perfectly fine. No headache, no seeing spots, no nausea or any ot

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HPV, Cervical Cancer and Cervical Cancer Screening: What Do You Need to Know?

Medically reviewed by Nancy Berman, MSN Infection with high-risk types of human papillomavirus (HPV), the cause of cervical cancer, is common. By the age of 50, 80% of women will have had an HPV infection with one or more of 14 high-risk HPV types. Most infections are cleared within 24 months. If the virus isn't cleared and persists, cells may become moderately or severely abnormal (also called pre-cancer). The purpose of screening by Pap and/or HPV testing is to find and then treat

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Birth Control: Understanding Your Options

There are plenty of options for birth control these days — which is great. But it also means there's a lot to learn about how they're the same and how they're different.In our new education program, we're here to help you figure it out. We asked Dr. Erica Montes, FACOG, an OB-GYN and creator of women's health blog "The Modern Mujer," about the questions you should ask your healthcare provider. We also help you understand the differences between hormonal and non-hormonal contraception and brea

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Britney’s Conservatorship Is One Example of How the Legacy of Eugenics in the US Continues to Affect the Lives of Disabled Women

By Michaela Kathleen Curran, University of Iowa Britney Spears has been locked in a court battle 13 years in the making. While her father was suspended as conservator of her estate on Sep. 29, 2021, her conservatorship might not be terminated until the next hearing on Nov. 12. During this conservatorship, she was limited in her ability to make everyday choices that most people take for granted. One revelation that came out of Spears' emotional testimony was that she was not

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Who Qualifies for a Covid Booster? The List Is Growing Longer

On Friday, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Director Rochelle Walensky said people whose jobs put them at risk of coronavirus infection qualify for a shot to boost the protection of their covid-19 vaccination.That step to include people with “institutional and occupational exposure" overrules the recommendation of her agency's advisory panel, and the move was a surprise to many. “It was not expected, but I think the director, Walensky, wanted to go along with what the FDA had said

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Britney’s Conservatorship Is One Example of How the Legacy of Eugenics in the US Continues to Affect the Lives of Disabled Women

By Michaela Kathleen Curran, University of Iowa Britney Spears has been locked in a court battle 13 years in the making. While her father was suspended as conservator of her estate on Sep. 29, 2021, her conservatorship might not be terminated until the next hearing on Nov. 12. During this conservatorship, she was limited in her ability to make everyday choices that most people take for granted. One revelation that came out of Spears' emotional testimony was that she was not

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Can Healthy People Who Eat Right and Exercise Skip the Covid-19 Vaccine? A Research Scientist and Fitness Enthusiast Explains Why the Answer Is No

By Richard Bloomer, University of MemphisI'm a fitness enthusiast. I also adhere to a nutrient-dense, “clean" eating program, which means I minimize my sugar intake and eat a lot of whole foods for the purpose of optimizing my health. You might wonder how effective such a diet and exercise plan would be in the fight against COVID-19, since some have suggested – without supporting evidence – that vaccination may be unnecessary if a detailed wellness lifestyle is closely followed. As a re

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Birth Control: Understanding Your Options

There are plenty of options for birth control these days — which is great. But it also means there's a lot to learn about how they're the same and how they're different.In our new education program, we're here to help you figure it out. We asked Dr. Erica Montes, FACOG, an OB-GYN and creator of women's health blog "The Modern Mujer," about the questions you should ask your healthcare provider. We also help you understand the differences between hormonal and non-hormonal contraception and brea

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Conversación sobre la salud: Preguntas que debería hacer a su proveedor de servicios médicos sobre los métodos de control natal

La Dra. Erica Montes hizo la revisión médica de este documento.El dilema del control natal parecía ser simple en el pasado: Una persona iba al doctor y simplemente pedía "la píldora". Pero ahora hay muchas opciones, incluyendo algunas no hormonales. Todo es un poquito más complicado. ¿Qué píldora? ¿Por qué? ¿Cuáles son los efectos colaterales? ¿Qué otras opciones hay? Todas estas son preguntas importantes que debe considerar cuando escoja su método de control natal.Le pedimos a

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Fast Facts: What You Need to Know About Birth Control

Español Medically reviewed by Dr. Sabrina SahniThe best birth control option varies for each person. It's important to consider factors such as your lifestyle, schedule, medical history and any medicines you take when you pick a birth control method. As these details change throughout your life, the best birth control option for you might change as well.Talking with your healthcare provider (HCP) can help you decide which type of birth control will work best for you. In the meantime, h

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Can Healthy People Who Eat Right and Exercise Skip the Covid-19 Vaccine? A Research Scientist and Fitness Enthusiast Explains Why the Answer Is No

By Richard Bloomer, University of MemphisI'm a fitness enthusiast. I also adhere to a nutrient-dense, “clean" eating program, which means I minimize my sugar intake and eat a lot of whole foods for the purpose of optimizing my health. You might wonder how effective such a diet and exercise plan would be in the fight against COVID-19, since some have suggested – without supporting evidence – that vaccination may be unnecessary if a detailed wellness lifestyle is closely followed. As a re

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Back-to-School Ready: A Conversation About Vaccines With Leading Experts and Parents Webinar

The pandemic has caused many parents to delay routine care, including things like dental cleanings and checkups. Because annual appointments are when many kids receive their scheduled vaccinations, those who missed their yearly checkups may also have missed vaccines. You may be wondering what to do if your child is behind on their vaccines and whether the Covid-19 vaccine affects back-to-school vaccines. What about herd immunity and booster shots? And will we need to think about the flu sh

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Evidence Shows That, Yes, Masks Prevent COVID-19 – and Surgical Masks Are the Way to Go

By Laura (Layla) H. Kwong, University of California, BerkeleyDo masks work? And if so, should you reach for an N95, a surgical mask, a cloth mask or a gaiter?Over the past year and a half, researchers have produced a lot of laboratory, model-based and observational evidence on the effectiveness of masks. For many people it has understandably been hard to keep track of what works and what doesn't.I'm an assistant professor of environmental health sciences. I, too, have wondered about the answe

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Hormonal vs. Non-Hormonal Contraception: What’s the Difference?

Erika Zar, 45, tried many different kinds of birth control before she settled on her current one. "Most of them seemed to amplify my mood shifts," she said. The birth control pills that she tried lowered her sex drive and made her depression worse, and the vaginal ring made her so "ragey" that she only lasted seven days with it.After two emergency surgeries to treat her endometriosis, Zar was prescribed a hormonal intrauterine device (IUD) to help control the disease — and she's still using o

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Fitness Training for Weight Loss

With all of the many ways that people are looking to get fit, why not do it in a way where you can see results almost immediately? Toning up and getting stronger is one good option. This type of weight loss method is used mostly by athletes and should be taken lightly. This type of weight loss should be done under the supervision of a professional so that you do not overstrain your body and also to make sure that you are following the correct procedures.  There are basically three differen

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Tiesta Tea Detox Tea Sampler Dry Flight Set - High to No Caffeine, Hot & Iced Tea, Loose Leaf Tea Sample Set with Green, &...

DETOX LOOSE LEAF TEA SAMPLER SET featuring our blends promoting weight loss, including Lemon Ginger Turmeric , Citrus Detox, Chocolate Ginger Turmeric, Lean Green Machine, Ginger Sweet Peach, Tasmanian Herbs & Matcha and Chinese Gunpowder TRADITIONAL AND UNIQUE FLAVORS bursting in each cup; the bright, bold flavors in our weight loss tea blends will leave you satisfied while helping you achieve your health goals; you won't feel like you're drinking diet tea; enjoy as hot or iced tea PREMIUM SLIM

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LifePro Rumblex 4D Vibration Plate Exercise Machine - Triple Motor Oscillation, Linear, Pulsation + 3D/4D Vibration Platfo...

THE MOST COMPREHENSIVE VIBRATING PLATFORM ON THE MARKET: Whether you’re looking to improve bone density, lose fat, build muscle tone, recover from an injury or surgery, or relieve chronic pain, the Rumblex makes the perfect partner. Amongst its many benefits, this whole body vibrating platform calms the nervous system, greatly improves bone density, and strengthens your core for greater balance. Get all the benefits of a therapy session from the comfort and convenience of your home. RECOVERY,

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Etekcity Scale for Body Weight, Smart Digital Bathroom Weighing Scales with Body Fat and Water Weight for People, Bluetoot...

Syncs with Fitness Apps-Works with Bluetooth on iOS and Android. Free VeSync app syncs data with Apple Health, Samsung Health, Google Fit & FitBit, so you can store all your data in one convenient, centralized location for viewing trends and tracking progress. FULL BODY COMPOSITION ANALYSIS- Get 13 essential measurements including Weight, BMI, Body Fat, Visceral Fat, Muscle Mass, Bone Mass, Body Water, and more! You can weigh yourself anytime, even without your phone on hand. The data will sync

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Wesoke Rubber Dumbbells Weights Pair Set with Non-Slip Grip, Hand Weights for Gym Fitness Workouts, Strength Training, Wei...

DUMBBELL HAND WEIGHT: Wesoke dumbbells have a soft and non-slip rubber coating and provide ergonomically curved handles to make you comfortable and safe when using in fitness. CONSTRUCTION: Made of high-quality cast iron core, so that your hand-held weights will not break or bend after repeated use. And adopt the anti-rolling design, so that your hand weight will not roll, and easy to stack. VERSATILE: Perfect for training individual muscle groups or major muscle groups, HIIT workouts, and walki

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Magnesium by Nature’s Bounty, 500mg Magnesium Tablets for Bone & Muscle Health, 200 Tablets

Contains (1) bottle of 200 coated tablets of Nature's Bounty 500 milligram Magnesium mineral supplements. Tablets are coated for easy swallowing and support bone and muscle health, maintaining bone mineralization. No artificial flavors or sweeteners. Gluten free Nature's Bounty High Potency Magnesium helps optimal bone support and muscle health. Magnesium aids in protein formation and nerve impulses. Since Magnesium absorption can decrease in older adults, taking a magnesium supplement may be es

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Florastor Daily Probiotic Supplement for Men & Women, 250 mg, 100 Capsules (Pack - 2)

DAILY PROBIOTIC SUPPLEMENT: Each capsule contains 250mg of our unique probiotic strain, which is larger & stronger than many other probiotics & provides increased intestinal coverage & protection. DIGESTIVE & IMMUNE SUPPORT: Florastor helps increase the natural flora in your digestive tract & supports overall health by strengthening your digestive balance & supporting a healthy immune system. HEALTHY LIFESTYLE: Made with ingredients found in nature that are vegetarian, gluten-free, & appropriate

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Hulavate Weighted Hula Hoop for Adults - Abdominal Core Strengthening, TIK Tok Hula Hoop, Weightloss Essentials - Hoola Ho...

FEEL THE BURN: Our 2.5lb weighted hula hoop has a stainless steel core for a satisfying all around balanced workout. With proper diet, our hula hoop can significantly help with burning calories and sculpting your desired figure. SOFT & GENTLE FOAM PADDING: This smooth foam padded weighted exercise hoop is an effective and convenient way to increase mobility, tone muscle and improve your mood in just a quick hoop session. The extra thick padding allows even the beginner to feel comfortable as the

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Heart Healthy Foods

The heart is the most important organ in our body; without it, we cannot survive. It pumps blood to all parts of your body and keeps you alive! But what if some food products that are consumed every day created a buildup on arteries leading to the heart? This can lead to plaque formation which blocks airflow as well as cause strokes or other unwanted conditions. If this sounds like something you want avoid at any cost, then make sure next time when looking for meals for tonight's dinner party tr

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How to Lose Weight by Walking

It's simple: Whenever you walk, your metabolism increases by more than 30%. So the next time you are standing around at work or sitting on a plane and don't feel like moving much, get up and start walking. You'll be able to burn 100-200 calories per hour so why not give it a try? As long as we're living upright in civilization (thanks mom!), there will always need to be something for us humans that is better suited then just sitting down!   All of us think we all know what exactly walking

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Fat Loss Supplement Be Right and Lose Weight

Losing weight can be challenging, but it doesn't have to feel like a chore. If you're tired of counting calories or dealing with hunger pangs and food cravings, then this is the right product for you! This formula has been scientifically proven to help reduce appetite and increase metabolism without any side effects. It also provides an all-natural approach that's free from chemicals such as stimulants, caffeine derivatives, laxatives (ease), diuretics (to get rid of water) - no matter what your

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Effects of Alcohol on Your Weight Loss

Some people believe that drinking more water can help with weight loss. What they don't know is how alcohol affects their efforts. Alcohol increases the body's insulin levels and blood sugar which could lead to a slower metabolism, fat accumulation on your waistline, increased appetite for unhealthy food items such as sweet desserts or salty snacks when you're feeling hungry after an alcoholic drink - all of these factors are detrimental to successful dieting endeavors! This article provides som

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Best Exercises To Lose Weight Quickly

The best exercises to lose weight quickly are not secrets reserved for a mere few. They're quite common, yet they're overlooked by many who seek an easy fix or quick results. What most people don't realize is that the answer isn't as elusive and mysterious as it may seem - It's more about what you do after your workout than before!   The best way to lose weight quickly is with some heart-pounding exercises. Walking up stairs or walking in general are great for burning fat and getting a go

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Solid Fitness Advice For Senior Citizens Trying To Lose Weight

Losing weight might not be the only reason why you are exercising. Even if it is, there's no need to feel discouraged or frustrated because of your age. You have a lot going for you that people in their twenties and thirties don't like being more physically fit now than they were twenty years ago! The following article will offer some tips on how seniors can lose those extra pounds without compromising quality of life too much:   One key thing about maintaining one’s fitness as an o

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Benefit from Foods that Speed Up Your Metabolism

It's no surprise that fast-food is associated with poor health. Unfortunately, most people don't know the difference between a good and bad food when it comes to their metabolism. The next time you're thinking about ordering something from McDonalds or KFC order some salad instead! You'll thank yourself later because of all those extra nutrients your body needs for optimal performance as well as increased energy levels in general which leads to more productivity at work/school etc...   Yo

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Weight Loss: Why Exercise Is Important

There are a lot of reasons to exercise. One is that your body will get in shape, and you'll look better. Another reason is because it's good for your heart health—when people with high blood pressure who work out regularly see their numbers drop dramatically! Working-out also helps relieve anxiety and stress by releasing endorphins into the bloodstream; so even if only one workout can make you feel on top of the world temporarily, imagine what practicing this habit every day could do over

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How Much Exercise For Weight Loss Is The Right Amount

If you're looking to lose weight, the amount of exercise you do per day plays a vital role. There are so many different opinions on how much time people should spend exercising each week in order to reach their goals and see results from that effort. One popular opinion is 30 minutes-3 hours a day depending on your current fitness level as well as what type of exercises will be most beneficial for your goal (cardio vs weights). On average, based off personal experience with clients who have lost

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